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For the coin dated 2003, see Ghanaian 10 cedi coin (fantasy).
10 cedis
Ghana 10 cedis 1991
1991 coin
General information
Country

Flag of Ghana Ghana

Value

GH₵10.00

Years

1991

Measurements and composition
Mass

3.5 g

Diameter

21.8 mm

Composition

nickel-plated steel

Appearance
Shape

heptagonal

Alignment

medallic

Edge

plain

Obverse

Cocoa tree (Theobroma cacao), national motto, state title

Reverse

Coat of arms of Ghana, value, year

v · d · e

The 10 cedi coin is a former circulation piece of the Republic of Ghana that was issued in a single type in 1991. It was distributed by the Bank of Ghana and struck under contract at the Royal Mint in Llantrisant, Wales.

The coin was initially legal tender in its country of origin, circulating for a nominal value of 10.00 second cedis. However, it was eventually demonetized on January 1, 2008, a few months after the third cedi was introduced.

A coin of the denomination was also produced in 2013 in observance of the 60th anniversary of the first East African Coronation Safari. It is uncertain whether this piece is legal tender and was authorized by the Bank of Ghana.

Coins[]

Circulation coin (1991)[]

After years of high inflation in Ghana, many of the country's low denomination coins had begun to disappear from circulation in the 1970s and 1980s. In response, the Bank of Ghana released a series of higher valued 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 cedi coins in 1991. Each was struck under commission at the Royal Mint in Llantrisant, Wales. The 10 cedi piece was issued solely in 1991, and was finally demonetized on January 1, 2008.

The piece is composed of nickel-plated steel and measures 3.5 grams in mass and 21.8 millimeters in diameter. It has medallic alignment and a plain edge, and is heptagonal in shape. Both of its rims are raised and undecorated.

An illustration of a cocoa tree (Theobroma cacao), including its fruits and trunk, is displayed inside a circular dashed border in the center of the obverse. Introduced to Ghana in the late 19th century, this species of tree has become important to the Ghanaian economy, which produces a large percentage of the world's cocoa. Engraved clockwise along the rim above the image is the state title "GHANA". It is accompanied by the national motto "FREEDOM AND JUSTICE", which is inscribed in the opposite direction from the piece's upper left to upper right peripheries. The two inscriptions are separated from one another by two small circular points.

The escutcheon from the coat of arms of Ghana – which features images of a crossing sword and ceremonial staff, the Osu Castle, a cocoa tree, and a gold mine separated by Saint George's Cross and a lion passant guardant – is illustrated in the center of the reverse. Engraved horizontally in the middle of the piece is the Gregorian date of minting, "1991", the first two digits separated from the last two by the arms. The face value "10 CEDIS" is also inscribed on the reverse, the numeral "10" appearing above the escutcheon and the word "CEDIS" written counterclockwise below the arms. Four decorative objects separate the year from the value.

The mintage of the coin is currently unknown. Only business strikes are reported to exist.

East African Coronation Safari coin (2013)[]

Officiality uncertain The officiality of this coin or banknote is uncertain.

It is uncertain whether this is an official piece or a fantasy. If information becomes available indicating it is valid, please remove this notice and add the source in the references section. If information suggesting otherwise becomes available, move this content to Ghanaian 10 cedi coin (fantasy).

In 1953, Kenya, Uganda, and Tanganyika hosted the first East African Coronation Safari in celebration of the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II (1926–; r. 1952–). The event, which became the East African Safari Rally in 1960 and the Safari Rally in 1975, has been held annually since then. In celebration of the 60th anniversary of the rally, a series of non-circulating 5, 10, and 20 cedi coins in precious metals was produced. Whether these pieces are legal tender and were authorized by the Bank of Ghana is currently uncertain.

The 10 cedi piece is composed of .900 fine gold and measures 3.456 grams in mass and 21 millimeters in diameter. It has medallic alignment and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised, and the rim on the obverse is decorated with a beaded border.

The coin's obverse features designs by British sculptor Ian Rank-Broadley (1952–). A right-facing portrait of an elderly Queen Elizabeth II wearing the Girls of Great Britain and Ireland Tiara is displayed in the center, the "IRB" initials of the artist engraved in small print below. Engraved clockwise along the rim to the upper left is the caption "ELIZABETH II", and inscribed in the same direction at the periphery to the upper right is the face value "10 CEDIS". The two inscriptions are separated from one another by a small circular point. Written in the opposite direction at the periphery below is the state title "REPUBLIC OF GHANA", which is separated between the words "REPUBLIC" and "OF" by a small coat of arms of Ghana. The arms on the piece consists of an escutcheon surmounted by the Black Star of Africa and a torse, supported by two tawny eagles (Aquila rapax) wearing the Order of the Star of Ghana, and displayed above a ribbon bearing the national motto "FREEDOM AND JUSTICE".

An illustration of a rally car with giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis) and trees in the background is displayed inside a solid circular boundary in the middle of the reverse. Engraved clockwise along the periphery above is the English legend "EAST AFRICAN CORONATION SAFARI". Displayed in the opposite direction at the rim below are the dates "1953-2013", which are flanked on both sides by a small circular point.

As many as 700 proof-like examples of the coin were manufactured.

References[]

Template:Ghanaian cedi

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