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Maldivian 10 laari coin

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The rufiyaa was established as the currency of the Maldives in [[1947]], during the earlier regnancy of Sultan {{wp|en|Abdul Majeed Didi}} (1873–1952). However, initially only [[banknote]]s were made for the currency, and the coins that were used on the Maldives during the period were previous [[Maldivian larin]]s and [[Sri Lankan rupee|rupees]] imported from the nearby nation of [[Dominion of Ceylon|Ceylon]]. In 1960, Muhammad Fareed Didi, the eldest son and successor of Abdul Majeed Didi, commissioned the Royal Mint in {{wp|en|Tower Hill}}, {{wp|en|London}} (later {{wp|en|Llantrisant, Wales|Llantrisant}}, [[Wales]]), to produce the first series of coins for the rufiyaa, which includes pieces denominated at [[Maldivian 1 laari coin|1]], [[Maldivian 2 laari coin|2]], [[Maldivian 5 laari coin|5]], 10, [[Maldivian 25 laari coin|25]], and [[Maldivian 50 laari coin|50]] laari. The 10 laari coin was initially minted in two compositions: [[nickel-brass]] and [[aluminum]]. The nickel-brass coin was discontinued in 1960, but the aluminum piece was struck again in 1979, nearly eleven years after the abolition of the Maldivian monarchy in 1968. Nickel-brass pieces weigh approximately 5.3 grams while their aluminum counterparts weigh 2 grams, and examples of both compositions measure 23.1 millimeters in diameter and about 2.19 millimeters in thickness. Each type is scalloped in shape (having twelve notches), and has [[medallic alignment]] and a plain [[edge]].
 
The rufiyaa was established as the currency of the Maldives in [[1947]], during the earlier regnancy of Sultan {{wp|en|Abdul Majeed Didi}} (1873–1952). However, initially only [[banknote]]s were made for the currency, and the coins that were used on the Maldives during the period were previous [[Maldivian larin]]s and [[Sri Lankan rupee|rupees]] imported from the nearby nation of [[Dominion of Ceylon|Ceylon]]. In 1960, Muhammad Fareed Didi, the eldest son and successor of Abdul Majeed Didi, commissioned the Royal Mint in {{wp|en|Tower Hill}}, {{wp|en|London}} (later {{wp|en|Llantrisant, Wales|Llantrisant}}, [[Wales]]), to produce the first series of coins for the rufiyaa, which includes pieces denominated at [[Maldivian 1 laari coin|1]], [[Maldivian 2 laari coin|2]], [[Maldivian 5 laari coin|5]], 10, [[Maldivian 25 laari coin|25]], and [[Maldivian 50 laari coin|50]] laari. The 10 laari coin was initially minted in two compositions: [[nickel-brass]] and [[aluminum]]. The nickel-brass coin was discontinued in 1960, but the aluminum piece was struck again in 1979, nearly eleven years after the abolition of the Maldivian monarchy in 1968. Nickel-brass pieces weigh approximately 5.3 grams while their aluminum counterparts weigh 2 grams, and examples of both compositions measure 23.1 millimeters in diameter and about 2.19 millimeters in thickness. Each type is scalloped in shape (having twelve notches), and has [[medallic alignment]] and a plain [[edge]].
   
Displayed in the center of the [[obverse]] is the {{wp|en|Emblem of Maldives|emblem of the Maldives}} &ndash; which consists of a {{wp|en|coconut palm}} (''{{wsp|Cocos nucifera}}'') and {{wp|en|star and crescent}} between two {{wp|en|Flag of the Maldives|Maldivian flags}} on thin poles, above a {{wp|en|scroll}} bearing the {{wp|en|Arabic language|Arabic}} "{{RTL|الدولة المحلديبية}}" ({{wp|en|Romanization of Arabic|Romanized}}: ''Ad-Dawlat Al-Mahaldheebiyya''; {{wp|en|English language|English}}: "State of the Mahal Dibayat"<ref group=N>"State of the Mahal Dibayat" is a name that was given to the Maldive Islands by medieval Arab travelers.</ref>) in {{wp|en|Naskh (script)|naskh}} style. Slanted upward at the upper left periphery of the coin is the {{wp|en|Gregorian calendar|Gregorian}} date in {{wp|en|Western Arabic numerals}} (i.e. "1960"), and angled downward at the upper right is the corresponding {{wp|en|Islamic calendar|Islamic}} year in {{wp|en|Eastern Arabic numerals}} (i.e. "{{RTL|١٣٧٩}}"; 1379). Engraved at the bottom center of the [[reverse]] is the value "10 {{RTL|ލާރި}}" (''dhiha laari''), with the numeral "10" (''dhiha'') and the word "{{RTL|ލާރި}}" (''laari'') printed on separate lines and the former written in a significantly larger font than the latter. On the coin, the number "10" (''dhiha'') is wider than it is tall, and a {{wp|en|serif}} and bottom line are added to the first digit. Written horizontally in small print above the "10" (''dhiha'') in the value is the {{wp|en|Maldivian language|Maldivian}} text "{{RTL|މާލެ، ދިވެހިރާއްޖެ}}" (''Malé, Dhivehi Raajje''). The "{{RTL|ދިވެހިރާއްޖެ}}" (''Dhivehi Raajje''), which translates roughly to English as "Land of the {{wp|en|Maldivians|Dhivehi People}}", attributes the coin to the Maldives, while the "{{RTL|މާލެ}}" (''Malé'') refers to the capital city of {{wp|en|Malé}}. The reason for the inclusion of the latter on the piece is not certain. The Arabic equivalent of the aforementioned Maldivian &ndash; "{{RTL|ماليه محلديب}}" (''Maliyya Mahaldib'')<ref group=N>"{{RTL|محلديب}}" (''Mahaldib'') is an earlier name for the Maldives in Arabic. The island country is currently referred to in the language as "{{RTL|مالديفز}}" (''Maldiifz'').</ref> &ndash; is inscribed in a counterclockwise direction along the upper rim of the piece in a larger font. The rims of both the obverse and reverse of the coin are raised.
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Displayed in the center of the [[obverse]] is the {{wp|en|Emblem of Maldives|emblem of the Maldives}} &ndash; which consists of a {{wp|en|coconut palm}} (''[[wikispecies:Cocos nucifera|Cocos nucifera]]'') and {{wp|en|star and crescent}} between two {{wp|en|Flag of the Maldives|Maldivian flags}} on thin poles, above a {{wp|en|scroll}} bearing the {{wp|en|Arabic language|Arabic}} "{{RTL|الدولة المحلديبية}}" ({{wp|en|Romanization of Arabic|Romanized}}: ''Ad-Dawlat Al-Mahaldheebiyya''; {{wp|en|English language|English}}: "State of the Mahal Dibayat"<ref group=N>"State of the Mahal Dibayat" is a name that was given to the Maldive Islands by medieval Arab travelers.</ref>) in {{wp|en|Naskh (script)|naskh}} style. Slanted upward at the upper left periphery of the coin is the {{wp|en|Gregorian calendar|Gregorian}} date in {{wp|en|Western Arabic numerals}} (i.e. "1960"), and angled downward at the upper right is the corresponding {{wp|en|Islamic calendar|Islamic}} year in {{wp|en|Eastern Arabic numerals}} (i.e. "{{RTL|١٣٧٩}}"; 1379). Engraved at the bottom center of the [[reverse]] is the value "10 {{RTL|ލާރި}}" (''dhiha laari''), with the numeral "10" (''dhiha'') and the word "{{RTL|ލާރި}}" (''laari'') printed on separate lines and the former written in a significantly larger font than the latter. On the coin, the number "10" (''dhiha'') is wider than it is tall, and a {{wp|en|serif}} and bottom line are added to the first digit. Written horizontally in small print above the "10" (''dhiha'') in the value is the {{wp|en|Maldivian language|Maldivian}} text "{{RTL|މާލެ، ދިވެހިރާއްޖެ}}" (''Malé, Dhivehi Raajje''). The "{{RTL|ދިވެހިރާއްޖެ}}" (''Dhivehi Raajje''), which translates roughly to English as "Land of the {{wp|en|Maldivians|Dhivehi People}}", attributes the coin to the Maldives, while the "{{RTL|މާލެ}}" (''Malé'') refers to the capital city of {{wp|en|Malé}}. The reason for the inclusion of the latter on the piece is not certain. The Arabic equivalent of the aforementioned Maldivian &ndash; "{{RTL|ماليه محلديب}}" (''Maliyya Mahaldib'')<ref group=N>"{{RTL|محلديب}}" (''Mahaldib'') is an earlier name for the Maldives in Arabic. The island country is currently referred to in the language as "{{RTL|مالديفز}}" (''Maldiifz'').</ref> &ndash; is inscribed in a counterclockwise direction along the upper rim of the piece in a larger font. The rims of both the obverse and reverse of the coin are raised.
   
 
A total of 601,270 nickel-brass 10 laari coins were produced in 1960, including 600,000 [[business strike]]s and around 1,270 [[proof coin|proofs]]. The total [[mintage]] for the aluminum coin is currently unknown. An undisclosed number of business strikes was coined in 1960, and unknown numbers of business strikes and proofs were made in 1979. The earlier of the two dates for the aluminum piece is not currently listed in the ''Standard Catalog of World Coins''.
 
A total of 601,270 nickel-brass 10 laari coins were produced in 1960, including 600,000 [[business strike]]s and around 1,270 [[proof coin|proofs]]. The total [[mintage]] for the aluminum coin is currently unknown. An undisclosed number of business strikes was coined in 1960, and unknown numbers of business strikes and proofs were made in 1979. The earlier of the two dates for the aluminum piece is not currently listed in the ''Standard Catalog of World Coins''.
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