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Cent
Mauritius 1 cent 1953 pf
1953 proof coin
General information
Country

Flag of Mauritius Mauritius
Flag of Mauritius 1923 British Mauritius

Used by

Flag of Mauritius Mauritius
Flag of Mauritius 1923 British Mauritius (1877–1968)
Flag of Seychelles 1961-1976 British Seychelles (1903–1914)

Value

0.01 rupee

Years

18771987

Measurements and composition
Mass

1.944 g

Diameter

17.76 mm

Thickness
  • 1 mm (1877-1978)
  • 1.27 mm (1987)
Composition
Appearance
Shape

round

Alignment

medallic

Edge

plain

Obverse
Reverse

State/colony title, value, year

v · d · e

The 1 cent coin is a former circulation piece of Mauritius. It was issued in six types from 1877 to 1987, five under British administration and two under the Commonwealth realm that existed from 1968 to 1992. Each was issued by the Bank of Mauritius and its precursor, the Board of Commissioners of Currency, and struck under commission at foreign mints.

The first coin of the denomination was introduced in 1877, during the reign of Queen Victoria (1819–1901; r. 1837–1901), and then struck intermittently until 1897. No Mauritian coins were produced under King Edward VII (1841–1910; r. 1901–1910), so the next cent was not issued until 1911, during the regnancy of King George V (1865–1936; r. 1910–1936). This piece was then produced until 1924, and followed in 1943 by a new cent featuring King George VI (1895–1952; r. 1936–1952), which was struck annually until 1947. A second type of George VI was then issued in 1949 and 1952, followed by a coin of Queen Elizabeth II (1926–; r. 1952–1992) produced from 1953 to 1978. A final cent featuring the likeness of former Prime Minister Seewoosagur Ramgoolam (1900–1985; i.o. 1968–1982) was then released in 1987. This type was not produced for circulation, and was distributed exclusively in coin sets.

All of the coins are legal tender in Mauritius, each carrying a nominal value of 0.01 rupee. The pieces of Victoria and George V were also used in Seychelles before 1914. In spite of the coins' status, however, they no longer circulate frequently due to their low purchasing power.

CoinsEdit

Coin of Victoria (1877–1897)Edit

Mauritius 1 cent 1878

1878 coin

In 1877 the Crown Colony of Mauritius, then comprised of Mauritius, Seychelles, and the British Indian Ocean Territory, introduced the rupee as its primary currency, replacing the dollar at a rate of 2 rupees to 1 dollar. That same year, the Board of Commissioners of Currency introduced the first series of coins for the new currency, which consisted of denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10, and 20 cents. Each was struck under commission at the Royal Mint and Birmingham Mint in the United Kingdom. The 1 cent piece of this initial series was produced intermittently until 1897, during the second half of Queen Victoria's reign.

The 1 cent coin is composed of a bronze alloy and measures about 1.944 grams in mass, 17.76 millimeters in diameter, and 1 millimeter in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a plain edge, and like most coins, is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and decorated with a dentilated border.

The obverse was designed by British engraver Leonard Charles Wyon (1826–1891). In its center, it displays a left-facing portrait of Queen Victoria wearing the George IV State Diadem on her head and ribbons in her hair. The English caption "VICTORIA QUEEN" is engraved clockwise from the coin's lower left to lower right peripheries, with "VICTORIA" appearing to the left of the queen's likeness and the word "QUEEN" inscribed to the right. On pieces struck in Birmingham, a small "H" mint mark is additionally printed at the bottom of the piece.

A large numeral "1" representing the coin's face value is engraved inside a circular beaded border in the middle of the reverse. Written clockwise along the rim above is the legend "MAURITIUS", and printed in the opposite direction at the periphery below is the written value "ONE CENT" followed by the Gregorian date of minting. The colonial name of Mauritius is separated from the value and year by two small flower-shaped objects, one at each side of the reverse.

Around 4,750,000 examples of the coin were manufactured, including several business strikes and a handful of proofs.

Mintages
Year Mint Mintage
1877 Birmingham Mint 700,000
1877 Proof Unknown
Royal Mint Unknown
1878 250,000
1878 Proof Unknown
1882 Birmingham Mint 300,000
1882 Proof Unknown
1883 Royal Mint 500,000
1883 Proof Unknown
1884 500,000
1884 Proof Unknown
1888 500,000
1890 Birmingham Mint 500,000
1896 Royal Mint 500,000
1897 1,000,000
1897 Proof Unknown
Total > 4,750,000

Coin of George V (1911–1924)Edit

Mauritius 1 cent 1911

1911 coin

After reigning for 63 years as Queen of the United Kingdom, Victoria died on January 22, 1901, at the age of 81. She was immediately succeeded by her oldest son, Prince Albert Edward, who ascended the throne as King Edward VII. Even though most British possessions eventually introduced coins featuring Edward, Mauritius did not. It was not until the reign of King George V, which began on May 6, 1910, that Mauritius would release a new series of coined currency. The first pieces of King George were 1 and 2 cent coins introduced in 1911. They would later be followed by a redesigned 5 cent piece in 1917 and the first ¼, ½, and 1 rupee coins in 1934. The cent of George V was struck intermittently from 1911 to 1924 at the Royal Mint of the United Kingdom.

The piece is composed of a bronze alloy and measures about 1.944 grams in mass, 17.76 millimeters in diameter, and 1 millimeter in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a plain edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and decorated with a dentilated border.

The obverse, designed by Australian sculptor Edgar Bertram Mackennal (1863–1901), features a left-facing bust of King George V in its center. In this illustration, the British monarch is portrayed bearded and wearing St. Edward's Crown and the Robe of State, collar of the Order of the Garter, and badge of the Order of the Bath. Engraved in small print in the bust truncation are the "BM" initials of the artist, abbreviated for "Bertram Mackennal". The English caption "GEORGE V KING AND EMPEROR OF INDIA" is inscribed clockwise from the coin's lower left to lower right rims, separated between the words "AND" and "EMPEROR" by the globus cruciger in St. Edward's Crown. A small circular point additionally appears at the bottom of the piece, below the bust of King George.

Aside from the date, the reverse is virtually identical to that of the Victorian cent. A large "1" representing the coin's face value appears inside a beaded circular boundary in the center. Printed clockwise along the rim above is the name of the issuing authority, "MAURITIUS", and inscribed in the opposite direction at the periphery below is the written value "ONE CENT" followed by the Gregorian date of minting. Two small flower-like objects, one at each side of the reverse, separate the legend "MAURITIUS" from the value and year.

A total of 5,200,000 examples of the coin were manufactured. Only business strikes of this type are known to exist.

Mintages
Year Mintage
1911 1,000,000
1912 500,000
1917 500,000
1920 500,000
1921 500,000
1922 1,800,000
1923 200,000
1924 200,000
Total 5,200,000

Coins of George VI (1943–1952)Edit

Mauritius 1 cent 1945

1945 coin

Mauritius 1 cent 1949

1949 coin

On January 20, 1936, King George V died of illness, bringing his nearly 21-year reign to an end. He was succeeded by his oldest son, Prince Edward Albert, who ruled as King Edward VIII (1894–1972; r. 1936) for less than a year before voluntarily abdicating at the end of 1936. The throne was then passed to Edward's oldest brother, Prince Albert, who adopted the monarchical name "George VI" in continuity with his father.

No Mauritian coins were produced under Edward, but a new series was introduced under George VI. The first coins of the new monarch, ¼ and 1 rupee pieces, were released into circulation in 1938. They were then followed by a new 5 cent coin in 1942, 1 and 2 cent pieces in 1943, a ½ rupee in 1946, and a 10 cent piece in 1947. The 1 cent coin of this series was struck annually at the South African Mint in Pretoria from 1943 to 1947.

Per the India Independence Act 1947, which officially granted India its independence, the title "Emperor of India" used by British monarchs was formally abolished. In accordance with this legislation, new Mauritian coins omitting the title of "Emperor" were introduced by the Board of Commissioners of Currency over the next few years. The first, 1 and 2 cent pieces, were released in 1949, followed by ¼, ½, and 1 rupee coins in in 1950 and a 10 cent piece in 1952. The redesigned cent was struck at the Royal Mint of the United Kingdom in 1949 and 1952.

The two 1 cent coins of George VI are composed of a bronze alloy and measure about 1.944 grams in mass, 17.76 millimeters in diameter, and 1 millimeter in thickness. They have medallic alignment and a plain edge, and are round in shape. Both of the rims of each piece are raised and decorated with a dentilated border.

The obverse of both pieces was designed by English sculptor Percy Metcalfe (1895–1970). A left-facing bust of King George VI wearing St. Edward's Crown appears in the center, the "PM" initials of the artist engraved in small print below. On coins produced from 1943 to 1947, the English caption "GEORGE VI KING AND EMPEROR OF INDIA" extends clockwise along the rim, beginning and ending at the left side of the obverse. This text is briefly separated between the numeral "VI" and the word "KING" by the globus cruciger in St. Edward's Crown. Pieces manufactured in 1949 and 1952 instead show the legend "KING GEORGE THE SIXTH", which is engraved clockwise from the lower left to lower right rims and is separated between "GEORGE" and "THE" by the king's likeness.

A large numeral "1" representing the coin's face value is engraved inside a beaded circular boundary in the middle of the reverse. On coins minted from 1943 to 1947, a small "SA" mark of the South African Mint is additionally engraved inside the border below the number. Printed clockwise along the rim above is the name of the issuing authority, "MAURITIUS", and inscribed in the opposite direction at the periphery below is the written value "ONE CENT" followed by the Gregorian date of minting. Two small flower-like objects, one at each side of the reverse, separate the legend "MAURITIUS" from the value and year. Triangular points also appear between the words "ONE" and "CENT" in the written value, and "CENT" and the date.

A total of 2,520,000 coins were manufactured from 1943 to 1947, and around 1,000,000 were produced in 1949 and 1952. Only business strikes of the 1943–1947 type are known to exist. A large number of business strikes and a smaller amount of proofs of the 1949–1952 coin were reportedly manufactured.

Mintages
Year Mintage
With "EMPEROR OF INDIA"
1943 520,000
1944 500,000
1945 500,000
1946 500,000
1947 500,000
Total 2,520,000
Without "EMPEROR OF INDIA"
1949 500,000
1949 Proof Unknown
1952 500,000
1952 Proof Unknown
Total > 1,000,000

Coin of Elizabeth II (1953–1978)Edit

Mauritius 1 cent 1953

1953 coin

After reigning for over 15 years, King George VI died on February 6, 1952, at the age of 56. Having passed away without a male heir, George was immediately succeeded by his oldest daughter, Princess Elizabeth, who ascended the throne as Queen Elizabeth II. During her reign, a new series of Mauritian coins was introduced, beginning with 1 and 2 cent pieces in 1953 and continuing with a 10 cent coin in 1954, 5 cent and 1 rupee pieces in 1956, a ¼ rupee in 1960, and a ½ rupee in 1965. Each of these coins was struck at the Royal Mint of the United Kingdom until 1978, ten years after Mauritius became an independent sovereign state. The cent was also struck at the Birmingham Mint in 1970.

The 1 cent piece of the series is composed of a bronze alloy and measures about 1.944 grams in mass, 17.76 millimeters in diameter, and 1 millimeter in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a plain edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and decorated with a dentilated border.

Designed by British sculptor Cecil Thomas (1885–1976), the obverse features in its center a right-facing portrait of Elizabeth II wearing St. Edward's Crown and a necklace. The queen's likeness is accompanied by the caption "QUEEN ELIZABETH THE SECOND", which extends clockwise from the coin's upper right to upper left peripheries.

A large numeral "1" representing the coin's face value is engraved inside a beaded circular boundary in the middle of the reverse. Printed clockwise along the rim above is the name of the issuing authority, "MAURITIUS", and inscribed in the opposite direction at the periphery below is the written value "ONE CENT" followed by the Gregorian date of minting. Two small flower-like objects, one at each side of the reverse, separate the legend "MAURITIUS" from the value and year. Triangular points also appear between the words "ONE" and "CENT" in the written value, and "CENT" and the date.

According to the Standard Catalog of World Coins, over 10,913,018 examples of the coin were manufactured, including 10,903,000 business strikes and over 10,018 proofs. The Weltmünzkatalog, however, reports a higher total mintage of 14,661,704 pieces, including 14,651,686 business strikes and around 10,018 proofs. All of the proofs struck in 1971 and 1978 were distributed in official proof sets by the Bank of Mauritius.

Mintages
Year Mint Mintage
Krause Schön
1953 Royal Mint 500,000 500,000
1953 Proof Unknown Unknown
1955 501,000 500,000
1955 Proof Unknown
1956 500,000 500,391
1956 Proof Unknown
1957 501,000 500,732
1959 501,000 500,563
1959 Proof Unknown
1960 500,000 500,000
1960 Proof Unknown
1961 500,000 500,000
1961 Proof Unknown
1962 500,000 500,000
1962 Proof Unknown
1963 500,000 500,000
1963 Proof Unknown
1964 1,500,000 1,500,000
1964 Proof Unknown
1965 1,500,000 1,500,000
1969 500,000 500,000
1970 Birmingham Mint 1,500,000 1,500,000
1971 Royal Mint 1,000,000 3,500,000
1971 Proof 750 750
1975 400,000 1,650,000
1978 Unknown
1978 Proof 9,268 9,268
Total > 10,913,018 ~ 14,661,704

Seewoosagur Ramgoolam coin (1987)Edit

Mauritius 1 cent 1987

1987 coin

In 1987, the Bank of Mauritius released a series of new 5 and 20 cent and ½, 1, and 5 rupee coins into circulation. These would later be followed in 1997 by a 10 rupee piece and in 2007 by a 20 rupee coin. A redesigned 1 cent piece was also introduced in 1987, but was issued exclusively in mint and proof sets and never released into circulation. It, like the other coins introduced in 1987, was struck under contract at the Royal Mint of the United Kingdom.

The 1987 cent is composed of copper-plated steel and measures 1.944 grams in mass, 17.76 millimeters in diameter, and 1.27 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a plain edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and decorated with a dentilated border.

A ¾ right-facing illustration of Seewoosagur Ramgoolam, the Prime Minister of Mauritius from 1968 to 1982, wearing a suit and tie and glasses is displayed in the middle of the obverse. A physician by profession, Ramgoolam adopted the title of "Doctor" before entering politics, and continued using it afterward. He later also obtained the style of "The Great Honourable" after becoming Chief Minister in 1961, and assumed the honorary titles of "Sir" and "Knight" (abbreviated "Kt") after his knighting in 1965. On the 1987 cent, all of these titles and styles are featured in the inscription "DR THE RIGHT HONOURABLE SIR SEEWOOSAGUR RAMGOOLAM KT", which is engraved clockwise from the coin's lower left to lower right peripheries. The beginning and end of this inscription are separated by a small square-shaped point at the bottom of the piece.

A large numeral "1" representing the coin's face value is engraved inside a beaded circular boundary in the middle of the reverse. Printed clockwise along the rim above is the name of the issuing authority, "MAURITIUS", and inscribed in the opposite direction at the periphery below is the written value "ONE CENT" followed by the Gregorian date of minting. Two small flower-like objects, one at each side of the reverse, separate the legend "MAURITIUS" from the value and year. Triangular points also appear between the words "ONE" and "CENT" in the written value, and "CENT" and the date.

Around 7,500 examples of the 1987 cent were manufactured, including 5,000 Brilliant Uncirculated pieces and 2,500 proofs. All were exclusively distributed in mint and proof sets by the Bank of Mauritius.

ReferencesEdit

Template:Mauritian rupee

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