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This article is about coins of the Portuguese escudo issued from 1914 to 2001. For earlier escudos of the Portuguese real, see Portuguese 1 escudo coin (real).
Escudo
Portugal 1 escudo 2000 2
2000 coin
General information
Country

Flag of Portugal Portugal

Used by

Flag of Portugal Portuguese Empire

Value

Cifrão symbol1.00

Years

19142001

Measurements and composition
Mass
  • 25 g (1914-1916)
  • 8 g (1924-1979)
  • 3 g (1981-1986)
  • 1.69 g (1986-2001)
  • 4.6 g (2001 gold)
Diameter
  • 37 mm (1914-1916)
  • 26 mm (1924-1979)
  • 18 mm (1981-1986)
  • 16 mm (1986-2001)
Thickness
  • 1.75 mm (1927-1968)
  • 2 mm (1969-1979)
  • 1.7 mm (1981-1986)
  • 1.2 mm (1986-2001)
Composition
Appearance
Shape

round

Alignment
  • medallic (1914, 1924-1968, 1979, 1982)
  • coin (1915-1916, 1969-2001)
Edge
  • reeded (1914-1968, 1986-2001)
  • plain (1969-1986)
Obverse

see text

Reverse

see text

v · d · e

The 1 escudo coin is a former circulation and commemorative piece of the Portuguese Republic. It was issued in nine types from 1914 to 2001, with at least one being introduced under the each Portuguese government during the period (excluding the National Salvation Junta). Each was distributed by the Bank of Portugal and struck at the Imprensa Nacional-Casa da Moeda (formerly the Casa da Moeda) in Lisbon.

The first coin of the denomination, a circulating commemorative celebrating the birth of the Republic, was introduced around 1914. It was then followed by a standard circulation piece issued in 1915 and 1916, which in turn was replaced by a third type struck in 1924 and 1926.

In 1927, the Ditadura Militar introduced a new circulating escudo. This piece was then struck annually by the regime until 1931, and again by the Estado Novo (also known as the Second Portuguese Republic) from 1935 to 1968. Under the latter government, an additional type was then introduced in 1969 and struck until 1974. It was produced again in 1975 under the short-lived National Salvation Junta, and from 1976 to 1979 under the current Third Portuguese Republic.

A new republican issue was then issued from 1981 to 1986, followed by a final circulating type distributed from 1986 to 2001. A circulating commemorative celebrating the 1982 Roller Hockey World Cup in Barcelos was also produced in 1982, and a non-circulating piece commemorating the "last escudo" was released in 2001.

Prior to their eventual demonetization, each of the coins circulated for a nominal value of 1.00 escudo in Portugal and its former colonies. During the period from February 28 to December 31, 2002, the final four types were also temporarily exchangeable for a value of about 0.005 euro.

CoinsEdit

Revolution coin (1914)Edit

1 Escudo commémorant la naissance de la République promue le 5 octobre, escudo frappé en 1914

1914 coin

On October 5, 1910, the Portuguese Republican Party organized a successful coup d'état against the Kingdom of Portugal. A republican regime was established in place of the constitutional monarchy, leading to the creation of the First Portuguese Republic. Under this new government, the real (meaning "royal") of the monarchy continued to be used until May 22, 1911, when the escudo was introduced as Portugal's new currency.

In 1911, the Portuguese government invited local artists to submit designs for a new series of national coins. Of the many submissions received, proposals by two sculptors, José Simões de Almeida (1880–1950) and Francisco dos Santos (1878–1930), were ultimately selected and incorporated onto Portuguese currency. In 1914, in commemoration of the fourth anniversary of the birth of the Portuguese Republic, the first 1 escudo piece of the new currency was released into circulation. It was engraved by Domingos Alves do Rego (1873–1960), and features designs by dos Santos on its obverse and Simões de Almeida on its reverse. Like most Portuguese coins, the piece was struck at the Imprensa Nacional-Casa da Moeda in Lisbon.

The coin is composed of .835 fine silver and measures 25 grams in mass and 37 millimeters in diameter. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and like most coins, is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and undecorated.

The obverse, designed by dos Santos, was based on his submission for a planned, but unrealized 4 centavo piece. In its center, it features a left-facing depiction of the Effigy of the Republic wearing a Phrygian cap and waving a lit torch. Personifying Portugal and the concept of liberty, this female figure is also portrayed with a Portuguese flag draped over her arm in front of a rising sun. Printed clockwise along the rim above is the Portuguese name of the Portuguese Republic, rendered as "REPUBLICA PORTUGUESA" without the acute on the first "U". It is accompanied by two pairs of five-pointed stars, one at either side of the obverse. The commemorative inscription "5 DE OUTUBRO DE 1910", Portuguese for "October 5, 1910", appears in large print near the bottom of the piece, the "5", "DE OUTUBRO DE", and "1910" all engraved on their own lines.

The reverse, designed by Simões de Almeida, was originally intended for the first 20 and 50 centavo pieces of Portugal. Displayed in the middle is the post-monarchical coat of arms of Portugal – which consists of a central escutcheon over an armillary sphere, both surrounded by two tied laurel branches. The escutcheon features five smaller escutcheons (quinas) containing five bezants each in its center and seven triple-towered castles in its boundary. On the coin, a fasces, then a common symbol of unity, also appears behind the central escutcheon and armillary sphere. Printed counterclockwise along the rim below the arms is the face value "1 ESCUDO".

Around 1,000,000 examples of the coin were manufactured during a single year of production. Only business strikes of this type are known to exist.

Gold patterns of the 1914 escudo, including a two-sided piece and uniface strikes featuring either side, are also reported to exist. They are listed as "rare" in the Standard Catalog of World Coins.

First Effigy design (1915–1916)Edit

Portugal 1 escudo 1915

1915 coin

Within the first eight years of the First Portuguese Republic's existence, the new government introduced its first complete family of circulating coins. An initial 50 centavo piece was released in 1912, followed by a similar 20 centavo coin in 1913. The first standard 10 centavo and 1 escudo coins were then issued in 1915, 1 and 4 centavo pieces were released in 1917, and a 2 centavo coin was distributed in two varieties in 1918. The escudo of this series, struck at the Imprensa Nacional-Casa da Moeda in 1915 and 1916, was designed by José Simões de Almeida and engraved by Domingos Alves do Rego.

The coin is composed of .835 fine silver and measures 25 grams in mass and 37 millimeters in diameter. It has coin alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and decorated with an ornate dentilated border.

The obverse of the coin, designed by Simões de Almeida in 1911, was originally designed for Portugal's 20 and 50 centavo pieces. A left-facing bust of the Effigy of the Republic appears in the center, a Phrygian cap and three stalks of grain covering her head. Printed clockwise along the rim is the Portuguese name of the Portuguese Republic, which is rendered as "REPUBLICA PORTUGUESA" without the acute over the first "U". Written in the opposite direction at the periphery below the allegory is the Gregorian date of minting, either "1915" or "1916".

The reverse features the coat of arms of Portugal in its center, the face value "1 ESCUDO" displayed counterclockwise along the rim below.

Around 3,223,000 examples of the coin were manufactured over two years of production. Only business strikes of this type are reported to exist.

Nickel-silver (alpaca) patterns of the coin dated 1915 are also known to exist.

Mintages
Year Mintage
1915 1,818,000
1916 1,405,000
Total 3,223,000

Seated Effigy design (1924–1926)Edit

Portugal 1 escudo 1924

1924 coin

During the first half of the 1920s, the First Portuguese Republic introduced its second (and final) series of circulating coins. The first pieces, redesigned 10 and 20 centavo coins, were introduced in 1920. They were then followed by new 5, 10, 20, and 50 centavo and 1 escudo pieces in 1924. The 1 and 2 centavo coins of the previous series continued to be struck until 1921 and 1922, respectively, while the 4 centavo piece was never issued again after 1917. The escudo of this new series, struck in 1924 and 1926 at the Imprensa Nacional-Casa da Moeda, was designed by José Simões de Almeida and engraved by Domingos Alves do Rego. It was eventually demonetized sometime prior to World War II.

The coin is composed of an aluminum-bronze alloy and measures 8 grams in mass and 26.8 millimeters in diameter. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and undecorated.

An illustration of the Effigy of the Republic seated on a throne is displayed in the middle of the obverse. In this depiction, the Effigy is portrayed wearing a Phrygian cap, and a palm frond is illustrated near her feet. In her left hand (at the right) she holds the Portuguese flag on a pole, and in her right (at the left) she carries an olive branch, a symbol of peace. The Portuguese name of the Portuguese Republic, rendered as "REPUBLICA PORTUGUESA" without the acute over the first "U", appears clockwise along the coin's rim, the first word displayed to the left of the Effigy and the second featured to the right. Written in the opposite direction at the periphery below is the Gregorian date of minting, either "1924" or "1926", and engraved in small print next to it is the "SIMÕES" signature of the artist.

A depiction of the escutcheon and armillary sphere from the coat of arms of Portugal appears in the center of the reverse. Two branches, one at either side of the piece, flank the illustration and connect below it. The numeral "1" is displayed on a ribbon at the top of the piece, while the word "ESCUDO" is engraved counterclockwise along the coin's lower periphery.

Around 10,062,000 examples of the coin were manufactured over two years of production. Only business strikes of this type are recorded.

Mintages
Year Mintage
1924 7,716,000
1926 2,346,000
Total 10,062,000

Second Effigy design (1927–1968)Edit

Portugal 1 escudo 1929

1929 coin

In 1926, factions of the Portuguese Armed Forces staged a successful coup d'état against the government, establishing the Ditadura Militar (Military Dictatorship) in place of the First Republic. This new government then evolved into the Ditadura Nacional (National Dictatorship) in 1928, which in turn became the integralist authoritarian Estado Novo regime (New State), or Second Portuguese Republic, in 1933.

In January 1928, the Ditadura Militar (National Dictatorship) released new 50 centavo and 1 escudo coins into circulation. These were later followed by the first 2.50, 5, and 10 escudo pieces in 1932. The 10 centavo coin of the previous series also continued to be struck during this period until 1940, but the 1, 2, and 5 centavo coins were not reissued under the new government or its successors because of their low purchasing power. The 1 escudo piece of the series, struck from 1927 to 1968 at the Imprensa Nacional-Casa da Moeda, was eventually withdrawn and demonetized on January 1, 1982, under the Third Portuguese Republic. It was designed by José Simões de Almeida and engraved by Domingos Alves do Rego.

The coin is composed of a copper-nickel-zinc alloy of 61 percent copper, 20 percent zinc, and 19 percent nickel and measures 8 grams in mass, 26.5 millimeters in diameter, and 1.75 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and decorated with a dentilated border.

A right-facing illustration of the Effigy of the Republic with a Phrygian cap and laurel branch on her head is displayed in the middle of the obverse. Printed clockwise from the coin's lower left to upper right peripheries is the Portuguese name of the Portuguese Republic, rendered as "REPUBLICA PORTUGUESA" without the acute over the first "U". It is followed by the Gregorian date of minting, which is separated from the state title by a small horizontal line. The "SIMÕES" signature of the designer additionally appears in small print at the bottom of the piece, the "REGO GR" signature of the engraver (gravador in Portuguese) displayed in incuse lettering to the right.

The coat of arms of Portugal is featured at the top center of the reverse, with the face value "1 ESCUDO" displayed on two lines below. In this representation of the value, the numeral is rendered in significantly larger font than the following word, which is curved counterclockwise along the coin's lower periphery. It is flanked on both sides by a small flower.

Around 46,109,300 examples of the coin were manufactured. Only business strikes of this type are reported.

Various patterns and trial strikes of the coin are also known to exist. Copper examples weighing 7.2 grams were minted in 1928 and 1939, silver pieces were struck in 1927, brass coins were manufactured in 1928, aluminum specimens weighing 6.25 grams were produced in 1940, and cupronickel pieces were minted in 1961, 1962, 1964, and 1966. Some of the cupronickel specimens feature the word "PROVA" (meaning "test" or "pattern") in the field between the Effigy and date on the obverse.

Mintages
Year Mintage
1927 1,917,000
1928 7,462,000
1929 1,617,000
1930 1,911,000
1931 2,039,000
1935 54,300
1939 304,000
1940 1,259,000
1944 993,000
1945 773,000
1946 2,507,000
1951 2,500,000
1952 2,500,000
1957 1,656,000
1958 1,447,000
1959 1,908,000
1961 2,505,000
1962 2,757,000
1964 1,611,000
1965 1,683,000
1966 2,607,000
1968 4,099,000
Total 46,109,300

1966 pattern coinsEdit

Around 1966, the Imprensa Nacional-Casa da Moeda considered redesigning the escudo coin. Although a new piece of the denomination would not be introduced until 1969, at least two patterns with rejected designs were struck in 1966. Both were designed by Portuguese sculptor Marcelino Norte de Almeida (1906–).

One piece struck in nickel-brass features a left-facing portrait of the Effigy of the Republic with a Phrygian cap on her head. Engraved in small print to the lower left is the word "PROVA".

The face value "1 ESCUDO" appears on two lines in the center of the reverse, the numeral rendered in significantly larger print than the following word. Written clockwise along the periphery above is the Portuguese name of the Portuguese Republic, "REPÚBLICA PORTUGUESA", the two words separated by a circular point. Engraved in the opposite direction at the periphery below is the Gregorian date of minting, "1966".

A bronze piece was struck using the same illustration of the Effigy on its obverse. This likeness is accompanied by the legend, "REPÚBLICA PORTUGUESA", which is engraved clockwise from the coin's lower left to lower right peripheries, and the Gregorian date of minting, which is displayed horizontally to the lower left of the image.

The reverse, identical in design to that of the 1969 escudo coin, features the face value "1 ESCVDO" on two lines at the top center. Five ears of wheat are additionally displayed below, and the "M NORTE" signature of the artist is inscribed in small print near the lower right rim. To identify the coin as a pattern, the word "PROVA" is engraved at an angle to the left of the face value.

The mintages of the 1966 patterns are currently unknown. Only a small number of examples of each design are known to exist.

Quinas design (1969–1979)Edit

Portugal 1 escudo 1979

1979 coin

On July 12, 1963, the Estado Novo released a series of redesigned 2.50 and 5 escudo coins into circulation. These were later followed by new 10, 20, and 50 centavo and 1 escudo pieces on August 4, 1969, and the first base metal 10 escudo coin in 1971. The 1 escudo piece of this new series, which was struck annually at the Imprensa Nacional-Casa da Moeda from 1969 to 1979, was eventually withdrawn from circulation on January 1, 1987, under the Third Portuguese Republic. It was designed by Portuguese sculptor Marcelino Norte de Almeida.

The coin is composed of bronze and measures 8 grams in mass, 26 millimeters in diameter, and 2 millimeters in thickness. Most examples have coin alignment, but pieces from 1979 are also known to use medallic alignment. The coin has a plain edge and raised, undecorated rims, and is round in shape.

An illustration of the five quinas from the Portuguese coat of arms appears in the middle of the obverse. Printed clockwise along the periphery above is the Portuguese name of the Portuguese Republic, stylistically rendered as "REPVBLICA PORTVGVESA" with a circular point between the two words. Displayed in the opposite direction at the coin's lower rim is the Gregorian date of minting, which is separated from the aforementioned legend by two decorative objects (✤).

The reverse of the piece features the face value "1 ESCVDO" on two lines at the top center, above five ears of wheat. Inscribed in small print to the lower right is the "M NORTE" signature of the artist.

Around 95,961,000 examples of the coin, all business strikes, were manufactured over its 11 years of production.

Bronze 1969-dated patterns weighing 7.2 grams, a 1970-dated nickel essai, and a 1979 pattern with a reeded edge are also known to exist.

Mintages
Year Mintage
1969 3,020,000
1970 6,009,000
1971 7,860,000
1972 3,815,000
1973 20,467,000
1974 11,444,000
1975 8,473,000
1976 7,353,000
1977 6,218,000
1978 7,061,000
1979 14,241,000
Total 95,961,000

1980 unissued pattern coinsEdit

First Quinas designsEdit

Around 1980, the Imprensa Nacional-Casa da Moeda once again decided to redesign the escudo piece. Several designs, including a handful of rejected submissions, were drafted to grace the new coin, which was scheduled to be released later in 1980. Virtually all of the patterns were minted at the Imprensa Nacional-Casa da Moeda on nickel-brass planchets identical in size to the 1981 escudo.

One rejected obverse design features the five quinas from the Portuguese coat of arms at the top center. The Portuguese name of the Portuguese Republic, "REPUBLICA PORTUGUESA" appears on two horizontal lines below, above the Gregorian date of minting, "1980".

This obverse design was paired with at least three reverse designs. One features an illustration of a flower accompanied by the face value "1 ESCUDO", the numeral displayed to the left in large print and the word featured below. Another design solely features the face value "1 ESCUDO", with the numeral extending from the top of the reverse to the bottom and partially overlapped by the word. A third design, which was ultimately selected for the 1981 escudo, simply features the face value "1 ESCUDO" on two lines, the numeral rendered in larger print than the following word. A uniface trial strike with just this is known to exist.

The mintages of these patterns are currently unknown. A small amount of each type are currently known to exist.

Second Quinas designEdit

Another rejected obverse design also appeared on a pattern in 1980. The five quinas from the Portuguese coat of arms appear in the center, the state title "REPUBLICA PORTUGUESA" inscribed clockwise along the periphery above. Engraved in the opposite direction at the rim below is the Gregorian date of minting, "1980".

The reverse of the pattern features the face value "1 ESCUDO" on two lines, the numeral rendered in larger print than the following word.

The mintage of this second pattern is also unknown. A small number of examples are currently known to exist.

First shield design (1981–1986)Edit

Portugal 1 escudo 1982

1982 coin

On April 25, 1974, the Armed Forces Movement (MFA) launched a successful coup d'état against the Estado Novo regime, establishing the National Salvation Junta in its place. The aims of this new regime were to oversee the formation of a new civilian government and prevent the collapse of the Republic during the transitional period. After functioning for about a year, the junta was disbanded in 1975 and the Third Portuguese Republic was formally established.

In 1980, after reviewing a series of submissions for a new escudo piece (as mentioned above), the Imprensia Nacional-Casa da Moeda approved a design featuring the Portuguese shield, rather than just the five quinas. Although dated 1981, the new piece was released into circulation by the Third Portuguese Republic on November 17, 1980. With the discontinuation of the 20 centavo coin in 1974 and the 10 and 50 centavo pieces in 1979, it was now the lowest denominated coin that continued to be issued by the Imprensia Nacional-Casa da Moeda. Produced annually from 1981 to 1986, the coin was finally officially withdrawn on February 28, 2002, and demonetized on December 31 of the same year. It, like the previous escudo, was designed by Portuguese sculptor Marcelino Norte de Almeida.

The coin is composed of a brass alloy of 78 percent copper, 20 percent zinc, and 2 percent nickel and measures 3 grams in mass, 18 millimeters in diameter, and 1.7 millimeters in thickness. Most examples have coin alignment, but pieces from 1982 are also known to use medallic alignment. The piece has a plain edge and raised, undecorated rims, and is round in shape.

The Portuguese shield, the escutcheon in the coat of arms of Portugal, is illustrated in the center of the coin's obverse. Printed clockwise along the periphery above is the Portuguese legend "REPUBLICA PORTUGUESA", and engraved in the opposite direction at the rim below is the Gregorian date of minting.

The face value "1 ESCUDO" is displayed on two lines in the middle of the reverse, the numeral rendered in significantly larger print than the following word.

Around 250,673,000 examples of the coin, all business strikes, were manufactured during its six years of production.

Mintages
Year Mintage
1981 30,165,000
1982 53,018,000
1983 53,165,000
1984 59,463,000
1985 46,832,000
1986 8,030,000
Total 250,673,000

1982 Roller Hockey World Cup coin (1982)Edit

Portugal 1 escudo 1982 RHWC

1982 commemorative coin

In 1982, 22 countries competed in that year's Roller Hockey World Cup. The tournament, the eighth to be hosted by Portugal, was played in Barcelos in the northeastern part of the country. In observance of this international event, the Imprensa Nacional-Casa da Moeda released a series of commemorative 1, 2.50, 5, and 25 escudo coins into circulation on September 4, 1982. Each was produced solely that year and designed by Portuguese artists Marcelino Norte de Almeida and Dorita de Castel-Branco (1936–1996). The 1 escudo piece of the series was officially withdrawn on February 28, 2002, and demonetized on December 31 of the same year.

The coin is composed of a nickel-brass alloy of 78 percent copper, 20 percent zinc, and 2 percent nickel and measures 3 grams in mass, 18 millimeters in diameter, and 1.7 millimeters in thickness. It has coin alignment and a plain edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and undecorated.

The obverse, designed by Norte de Almeida, features the Portuguese shield in its center. Engraved clockwise along the periphery above is the state title "REPÚBLICA PORTUGUESA", the two words separated by a small circular point at the top of the piece. Engraved in the opposite direction at the bottom of the piece is the face value "1$00", which is separated from the aforementioned legend by two small small floral points.

Displayed in the middle of the reverse, designed by Castel-Branco, is an illustration of a roller hockey player skating toward a hockey ball to the right. The man is portrayed wearing shorts, skates, knee pads, and gloves and holding a hockey stick in his hands. The numeral "82", shortened for "1982", is displayed in large print to the upper left, and the "incm" mark of the Imprensa Nacional-Casa da Moeda and another "82" are engraved in smaller print to the upper right. The artist's signature, "DORITA", is also visible in a small font below the hockey player's skates. Printed counterclockwise along the rim below is the Portuguese legend "MUNDIAL HÓQUEI", which translates to English as "world hockey".

Around 1,990,000 examples of the coin, all business strikes, were manufactured during a single year of production.

Final design (1986–2001)Edit

Portugal 1 escudo 2000

2000 coin

On September 12, 1986, the Third Portuguese Republic began issuing the last series of escudo coins. That year, the Bank of Portugal released redesigned 1, 5, 10 and new 20 and 50 escudo pieces into circulation. They were then joined by a 100 escudo coin on December 20, 1989, and a 200 escudo piece in 1991. Because of its infrequent use, the 2.50 escudo coin was not reissued under this new series. The 1 escudo piece of the series, struck annually from 1986 to 2001, was officially withdrawn from circulation on February 28, 2002, and demonetized on December 31 of the same year. It was designed by Portuguese sculptor Hélder Batista (1932–2015).

In commemoration of the end of the Portuguese escudo, the Imprensa Nacional-Casa da Moeda also struck a .917 gold escudo coin in 2001. Marketed as the Escudo em Ouro, or "gold escudo", the piece was never released into circulation and sold exclusively to collectors and investors. Like the circulating piece, it remained legal tender until December 1, 2002.

The circulating coin is composed of a brass alloy of 79 percent copper, 20 percent zinc, and 1 percent nickel and measures 1.69 grams in mass, 16 millimeters in diameter, and 1.2 millimeters in thickness. The gold piece is noticeably heavier with a mass of 4.6 grams, but its other dimensions are identical. Both types have coin alignment and a reeded edge, and are round in shape. The rims of each are raised and undecorated.

A depiction of the Portuguese shield is displayed below a tied knot in the middle of the obverse. It is accompanied by the Portuguese state title "REPUBLICA PORTUGUESA", which is engraved clockwise from the coin's upper right to left peripheries, and the Gregorian date of minting, which is inscribed in the same direction at the upper left rim. A group of four circular points separates the two words and the second word from the date. On gold pieces, "Au", the symbol of gold, also appears in small print above the shield.

An illustration of a decorative stained glass window appears at the top center of the obverse. On coins produced from 1986 to 1992, the outline of this image consists of a single thin line. Later pieces, however, use a thicker outline consisting of two lines. The face value "1 ESCUDO" is displayed below, the numeral rendered in larger, thicker print than the following word, which is engraved counterclockwise along the coin's lower boundary. The "H.BATISTA" signature of the artist is engraved in small print to the left, and the "incm" mark of the Imprensa Nacional-Casa da Moeda is inscribed to the right. These markings are noticeably smaller on pieces struck before 1992 than on later examples.

Around 218,782,800 brass coins were minted, including around 218,306,500 business strikes; 406,500 Brilliant Uncirculated pieces; and 69,800 proofs. All of the uncirculated and proof pieces were distributed in official mint and proof sets.

Only around 50,000 gold escudos were produced, each in a Brilliant Uncirculated grade.

Mintages
Year Mintage
Brass coin
1986 14,882,000
1987 21,922,000
1988 17,168,000
1989 17,194,000
1990 19,008,000
1991 18,456,000
1992 22,000,000
1993 10,505,000
1993 Proof 5,000
1994 10,328,000
1994 Proof 7,000
1995 12,000,000
1995 Proof 5,000
1996 12,000,000
1996 Proof 5,000
1997 8,000,000
1997 Proof 10,000
1998 4,000,000
1998 Proof 7,800
1999 10,000,000
1999 Proof 15,000
2000 21,000,000
2000 Proof 5,000
2001 250,000
2001 Proof 10,000
Total 218,782,800
Gold
2001 50,000

LegacyEdit

Portugal 10 euro 2010 escudo rev

A 10 euro coin featuring the final escudo coin (bottom)

In the months and years following Portugal's adoption of the euro, the final escudo coin has become a symbol of Portugal's now defunct currency. It has since appeared on a handful of non-circulating commemorative coins of Portugal and other countries.

In 1999, the former Portuguese colony of São Tomé and Príncipe issued a series of 11 commemorative 2,000 dobra pieces celebrating the introduction of the euro. Each piece represented one of the 11 countries to join the eurozone in 1999, including Portugal. The Portuguese piece features an embedded escudo coin on its reverse.

In 2002, the Republic of the Congo, Fiji, Nauru, North Korea, Samoa, Tokelau, and Tonga released a joint coin series celebrating the final issues of 17 European currencies (although some of the commemorated currencies had yet to be discontinued). A 5 dollar piece of Tokelau was struck to commemorate the "final issue of the Portuguese escudo", and features a rendition of the last 1 escudo coin on its reverse.

In 2005, a series of Liberian 5 dollar coins was also issued in commemoration of the euro. One example displays the final escudo coin on its reverse, next to a rendition of a 1 euro coin.

In 2010, the Imprensa Nacional-Casa da Moeda issued a commemorative 10 euro piece as part of an Ibero-American coin series celebrating historical coins and currency. At the bottom of the reverse, this piece includes an outline of the final escudo coin.

ReferencesEdit

Template:Portuguese escudo

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