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Not to be confused with the South African 1 penny coin.
Cent
South Africa 1 cent 2001
2001 coin
General information
Country

Flag of South Africa South Africa

Used by
Multilateral Monetary Area

Flag of Lesotho Lesotho
Flag of Namibia Namibia
Flag of South Africa South Africa
Flag of Swaziland Swaziland

Value

0.01 rand

Years

19612001

Measurements and composition
Mass
  • 9.42 g (1961-1964)
  • 3 g (1965-1989)
  • 1.5 g (1990-2001)
Diameter
  • 31 mm (1961-1964)
  • 19.05 mm (1965-1989)
  • 15 mm (1990-2001)
Thickness
  • 2 mm (1961-1964)
  • 1.57 mm (1965-1989)
  • 1.3 mm (1990-2001)
Composition
Appearance
Shape

round

Alignment

medallic

Edge
  • reeded (1965-1989)
  • plain (1961-1964, 1990-2001)
Obverse

See text

Reverse

See text

v · d · e

The 1 cent coin is a former circulation piece of the Republic of South Africa. It was issued in 13 types from 1961 to 2001, during the post-colonial administration of South Africa. Each was distributed by the South African Reserve Bank (SARB) and struck at the South African Mint in Pretoria.

The first coin of the denomination was introduced in 1961, the year of South Africa's independence, and then produced annually until 1964. It was then followed in 1965 by two similar types, one with Afrikaans text and the other with English legends. This piece was then struck until 1969. A bilingual Afrikaans and English type was released a year later in 1970, and struck annually until 1989. Yet another bilingual type was produced from 1990 to 1995, followed in 1996 by a similar coin with Swazi and Zulu inscriptions, and from 1997 to 2000 by a piece with Southern Ndebele legends. A final type with Southern Ndebele text was then released in 2000 and produced until 2001.

Circulating commemoratives of the denomination were also issued. The first two were released in 1968 in celebration of State President Charles Robberts Swart (1894–1982; i.o. 1961–1967), who retired from politics the previous year. A cent commemorating the presidency of Jacobus Johannes Fouché (1898–1980; i.o. 1968–1975) was then introduced in 1976, followed by a piece celebrating State President Nico Diederichs (1903–1978; i.o. 1975–1978) in 1979 and a coin featuring former State President B. J. Vorster (1915–1983; i.o. 1978–1979) in 1982.

All 13 types are currently legal tender in the Multilateral Monetary Area (MMA), which includes the southern African nations of South Africa, Lesotho, Namibia, and Swaziland. Each carries a nominal value of 0.01 rand, the equivalent of 0.01 loti in Lesotho, 0.01 dollar in Namibia, and 0.01 lilangeni in Swaziland. In spite of this, because of their low purchasing power and withdrawal on April 1, 2002, the coins no longer circulate frequently in the four countries.

CoinsEdit

First standard design (1961–1964)Edit

South Africa 1 cent 1961

1961 coin

Following a successful referendum in 1960, South Africa became independent from the United Kingdom on May 31, 1961. A few months earlier on February 14, the decimalized rand was also introduced as the new currency of South Africa, replacing the pound at a rate of 2 rand to 1 pound. On that date, the first series of coins of the rand, consisting of denominations of ½, 1, , 5, 10, 20, and 50 cents, was released by the South African Reserve Bank. The 1 cent piece of the series, like the other coins, was produced annually until 1964.

The 1 cent coin is composed of a brass alloy and measures 9.42 grams in mass, 31 millimeters in diameter, and 2 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a plain edge, and like most coins, is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and decorated with a dentilated border.

The obverse of the coin was designed by South African artist Willie Myburg. In its center, it features a ¼ right-facing illustration of Jan van Riebeeck (1619–1677), a Dutch navigator and the founder of Cape Town and the Dutch Cape Colony. Printed clockwise along the rim to the left is the English translation of the national motto, "UNITY IS STRENGTH". Its Afrikaans equivalent, "EENDRAG MAAK MAG", is engraved in the same direction at the periphery to the right, separated from the English text by a small decorative object at the top and bottom of the piece.

The coin's reverse was designed by Hilda Mason. In the middle, it shows a depiction of a covered wagon used by the Voortrekkers, Boer pastoralists who migrated east from the Cape Colony in the 19th century. A section of land appears in the illustration below the wagon, the "HM" initials of the artist engraved at the lower right. The size of this piece of land varies, appearing larger or "fuller" on some examples than others. In Hern's Handbook on South African Coins and Patterns, author Brian Hern suggests around 80 coins with a "full ground cover" exist, and of these, only 12 are known. The Weltmünzkatalog does not provide mintage figures, but reports a significantly higher price for the "wide" variety. Printed clockwise along the rim to the left of the wagon is the English legend "SOUTH AFRICA", and engraved in the same direction at periphery to the right is the Afrikaans equivalent, "SUID-AFRIKA". The Gregorian date of minting appears at the top of the piece, separated from the names of South Africa by two small diamonds. Displayed in the opposite direction at the lower rim is the face value "1 c", abbreviated for "1 cent", which is flanked on both sides by a decorative separator.

A total of 97,572,399 examples of the coin were produced, including 97,541,000 business strikes and 31,399 proofs. All of the proofs were distributed in official sets by the South African Reserve Bank.

Mintages
Year Mintage
1961 52,266,000
1961 Proof 7,530
1962 21,929,000
1962 Proof 3,844
1963 9,081,000
1963 Proof 4,025
1964 14,265,000
1964 Proof 16,000
Total 97,572,399

Second standard design (1965–1969)Edit

South Africa 1 cent 1966 af

1966 coin

South Africa 1 cent 1969 en

1969 coin

In 1965, the South African Reserve Bank introduced a second series of South African coins, which consisted of denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 cents and 1 rand. Two versions of each piece were released: a type with Afrikaans legends and another with English inscriptions. With the exception of the 1 rand coin, which was struck from 1966 to 1968, each of the six coins was produced annually from 1965 to 1967, and then again in 1969.

The 1 cent coin of the series is composed of a bronze alloy and measures 3 grams in mass, 19.05 millimeters in diameter, and 1.57 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and undecorated.

The obverse of the piece was designed by South African artist Thomas Sasseen. It features a right-facing portrait of Jan van Riebeeck at the center left, with the "T.S." initials of the artist engraved in small print to the lower left. On English coins, the legend "SOUTH AFRICA" is engraved clockwise along the rim to the upper right, while on Afrikaans pieces, "SUID-AFRIKA" is displayed in its place. The Gregorian date of minting follows the legend on both coins, curved in the same direction at the lower right periphery.

The reverse was also designed by Thomas Sasseen. An illustration of two Cape sparrows (Passer melanurus) perched on a tree branch appears in the center, the "T.S." initials of the artist engraved in small print below. Native to parts of southern Africa, the Cape sparrow first appeared on South African currency in 1923 on the reverse of a ¼ penny (farthing). Displayed in large print above is the face value "1c", abbreviated for "1 cent".

A total of 81,518,073 English and 81,530,031 Afrikaans examples of the coin were produced. Of the English coins, 81,435,500 were minted as business strikes, 57,500 as Brilliant Uncirculated pieces, and 25,073 as proofs. Of the Afrikaans pieces, 81,410,346 were produced as business strikes, 57,500 as Brilliant Uncirculated coins, and 62,185 as proofs. All of the uncirculated and all but 100 of the proofs were distributed in official mint and proof sets by the South African Reserve Bank.

Mintages
Year Mintage
English Afrikaans
1965 26,000 846
1965 Proof 25,073 185
1966 50,157,000 50,157,000
1966 Proof 25,000
1967 21,114,000 21,114,000
1967 Proof 25,000
1969 10,196,000 10,196,000
1969 Proof 12,000
Total 81,518,073 81,530,031

Swart coins (1968)Edit

South Africa 1 cent 1968 af

1968 coin

South Africa 1 cent 1968 en

1968 coin

In 1967, after serving six years as State President of South Africa, Charles Robberts Swart decided to retire from politics. In celebration of his former presidency, the South African Reserve Bank released a series of commemorative 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 cent coins into circulation in 1968. Like the series introduced in 1965, each piece was issued in two varieties: a type with Afrikaans legends and another with English inscriptions. They were only manufactured in 1968.

The 1 cent coin of the series is composed of a bronze alloy and measures 3 grams in mass, 19.05 millimeters in diameter, and 1.57 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and undecorated.

The obverse of the piece was designed by Thomas Sasseen. A left-facing portrait of Charles Swart wearing a suit and tie and his signature glasses appears in the center, the "T.S." initials of the artist engraved in small print below. Printed clockwise along the rim to the left is the name of South Africa, which reads "SOUTH AFRICA" on English coins and "SUID-AFRIKA" on Afrikaans pieces. Displayed in the same direction at the top of the piece is the Gregorian date of minting, "1968".

The reverse of the coin, designed by Thomas Sasseen, is identical to that of the 1965 cent. Two Cape sparrows perched on a branch appear in the middle of the piece, below the face value "1c", abbreviated for "1 cent". Engraved in small print below the rightmost of the two birds are the "T.S." initials of the artist.

A total of 6,025,000 English and 6,000,000 Afrikaans examples of the coin were manufactured. Of the English pieces, 59,950,000 were produced as business strikes, 50,000 as Brilliant Uncirculated coins, and 25,000 as proofs. Only business strikes of the Afrikaans coin are known to exist. All of the proofs and uncirculated pieces were distributed in official sets by the South African Reserve Bank.

Mintages
Year Mintage
English Afrikaans
1968 6,000,000 6,000,000
1968 Proof 25,000
Total 6,025,000 6,000,000

Third standard design (1970–1989)Edit

South Africa 1 cent 1987

1987 coin

In 1970, the South African Reserve Bank introduced a new series of South African coins. Consisting of pieces with denominations of ½, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 cents and 1 rand, the series was noticeably different from its predecessors. Although the reverse designs remained unchanged (excluding the ½ cent), the obverse was modified to include the 1932 coat of arms of South Africa instead of Jan van Rieebeck's likeness. In addition, in contrast to the 1965 series, each piece was bilingual, incorporating legends in English and Afrikaans on one coin. The 1 cent piece of the series was produced every year from 1970 to 1989, excluding 1976, 1979, and 1982.

The 1 cent coin is composed of a bronze alloy and measures 3 grams in mass, 19.05 millimeters in diameter, and 1.57 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and undecorated.

The obverse was engraved by Thomas Sasseen from 1970 to 1983, and then by Arthur Sutherland from 1984 to 1989. It features a rendition of the 1932 coat of arms of South Africa in its center – which consists of a central escutcheon displaying a figure of Hope, two wildebeests (Connochaetes), an orange tree (Citrus × sinensis), and a covered wagon in quarters. In the arms, this escutcheon is supported by a springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis) and gemsbok (Oryx gazella) and surmounted by a helmet and lion holding four rods. A grassy compartment containing two flowers and the national motto "EX UNITATE VIRES" (Latin for "Unity is Strength") is displayed below. On the coin (except 1984 examples), the initials of the engraver, either "T.S." for Thomas Sasseen or "A.L.S." for Arthur Sutherland, are engraved in small print near the base of the arms. Written clockwise along the rim to the left is the Afrikaans legend "SUID-AFRIKA", and engraved in the same direction at the periphery to the right is its English equivalent, "SOUTH AFRICA". The Gregorian date of minting appears in the opposite direction at the lower rim, where it is flanked by two decorative separators. An additional separator is engraved at the top of the piece, between the Afrikaans and English names of South Africa.

The reverse of the coin, designed by Thomas Sasseen, is identical to that of the 1965 cent. Two Cape sparrows perched on a branch appear in the middle of the piece, below the face value "1c", abbreviated for "1 cent". Engraved in small print below the rightmost of the two birds are the "T.S." initials of the artist.

Around 1,937,093,896 examples of the coin were manufactured, including 1,936,621,083 business strikes, 269,067 Brilliant Uncirculated pieces, and 203,746 proofs. Of these, all of the uncirculated pieces and most of the proofs were distributed in official sets by the South African Reserve Bank.

Mintages
Year Mark Mintage
1970 T.S.
(Thomas Sasseen)
37,072,000
1970 Proof 10,000
1971 34,053,000
1971 Proof 12,000
1972 35,662,000
1972 Proof 10,000
1973 35,898,000
1973 Proof 11,000
1974 54,940,000
1974 Proof 15,000
1975 62,982,000
1975 Proof 18,000
1977 72,444,000
1977 Proof 19,000
1978 70,152,000
1978 Proof 17,000
1980 63,432,000
1980 Proof 15,000
1981 63,444,000
1981 Proof 10,900
1983 182,131,000
1983 Proof 14,135
1984 None
(Arthur Sutherland)
170,155,000
1984 Proof 11,250
1985 A.L.S.
(Arthur Sutherland)
186,042,000
1985 Proof 9,859
1986 169,734,000
1986 Proof 7,000
1987 120,674,000
1987 Proof 6,781
1988 240,272,000
1988 Proof 7,250
1989 337,803,150
1989 Proof 9,571
Total 1,937,093,896

Fouché coin (1976)Edit

South Africa 1 cent 1976

1976 coin

In 1975, Jacobus Johannes Fouché completed his seven-year term as State President of South Africa. In celebration of his former presidency, the South African Reserve Bank released a series of commemorative ½, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 cent coins into circulation in 1976. Unlike the 1968 pieces celebrating Charles Swart, each of the 1976 coins is bilingual, incorporating English and Afrikaans legends. They were produced solely in 1976.

The 1 cent coin is composed of a bronze alloy and measures 3 grams in mass, 19.05 millimeters in diameter, and 1.57 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and undecorated.

The obverse of the coin was designed by Jean Baptiste Buisset. In its center, it features a right-facing bust of Jacobus Johannes Fouché wearing a suit and tie and glasses, the "J.B." initials of the artist engraved in small print below. Printed clockwise along the periphery to the left is the Afrikaans legend "SUID-AFRIKA", and engraved in the same direction at the rim to the right is its English equivalent, "SOUTH AFRICA". The Gregorian date of minting, "1976", appears counterclockwise at the bottom of the piece, and is flanked on both sides by decorative separators.

The reverse of the coin, designed by Thomas Sasseen, is identical to that of the 1965 cent. Two Cape sparrows perched on a branch appear in the middle of the piece, below the face value "1c", abbreviated for "1 cent". Engraved in small print below the rightmost of the two birds are the "T.S." initials of the artist.

A total of 91,881,000 examples of the coin were manufactured, including 91,840,000 business strikes, 20,000 Brilliant Uncirculated pieces, and 21,000 proofs. All of the uncirculated and proof coins were distributed in official mint and proof sets by the South African Reserve Bank.

Diederichs coin (1979)Edit

South Africa 1 cent 1979

1979 coin

In 1978, three years into his term as State President, Nico Diederichs died of a heart attack at the age of 74. In celebration of his life and short presidency, the South African Reserve Bank issued a series of circulating commemorative ½, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 cent and 1 rand coins in 1979. Each was produced solely that year.

The 1 cent coin is composed of a bronze alloy and measures 3 grams in mass, 19.05 millimeters in diameter, and 1.57 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and undecorated.

The obverse of the piece was designed by South African artist Lourens de Lange. In its center, it features a left-facing bust of Nico Diederichs wearing a suit and tie and glasses, the "LDL" initials of the artist engraved in small print below. Written clockwise along the periphery to the left is the Afrikaans legend "SUID-AFRIKA", and engraved in the same direction at the rim to the right is the English equivalent, "SOUTH AFRICA". The Gregorian date of minting, "1979", is displayed in the opposite direction below Diederich's likeness, and is separated by the Afrikaans and English legends by two circular points.

The reverse of the coin, designed by Thomas Sasseen, is identical to that of the 1965 cent. Two Cape sparrows perched on a branch appear in the middle of the piece, below the face value "1c", abbreviated for "1 cent". Engraved in small print below the rightmost of the two birds are the "T.S." initials of the artist.

A total of 63,447,000 examples of the coin were manufactured, including 63,412,000 business strikes, 20,000 Brilliant Uncirculated pieces, and 15,000 proofs. All of the uncirculated and proof coins were distributed in official sets by the South African Reserve Bank.

Vorster coin (1982)Edit

South Africa 1 cent 1982

1982 coin

Facing opposition for his involvement in the Muldergate Scandal, State President B. J. Vorster was forced to resign from public office in 1979. A controversial figure, Vorster was the first non-acting State President to not be honored on currency the year after his presidency ended. Nonetheless, the South African Reserve Bank eventually introduced a series of ½, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 cent and 1 rand coins commemorating Vorster in 1982, three years after his resignation and one year before his death in 1983. Each piece was struck solely in 1982.

The 1 cent coin is composed of a bronze alloy and measures 3 grams in mass, 19.05 millimeters in diameter, and 1.57 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and undecorated.

The obverse, designed by Lourens de Lange, displays a ¼ right-facing portrait of B. J. Vorster wearing a suit and tie in its center, the "LDL" initials of the artist engraved in small print below. Written clockwise along the periphery to the left is the Afrikaans legend "SUID-AFRIKA", and engraved in the same direction at the rim to the right is the English equivalent, "SOUTH AFRICA". The Gregorian date of minting, "1979", is displayed in the opposite direction below Vorster's likeness, and is separated by the Afrikaans and English legends by two circular points.

The reverse of the coin, designed by Thomas Sasseen, is identical to that of the 1965 cent. Two Cape sparrows perched on a branch appear in the middle of the piece, below the face value "1c", abbreviated for "1 cent". Engraved in small print below the rightmost of the two birds are the "T.S." initials of the artist.

A total of 145,966,000 examples of the coin were manufactured, including 145,944,000 business strikes, 10,000 Brilliant Uncirculated pieces, and 12,000 proofs. All of the uncirculated and proof coins were sold in official sets by the South African Reserve Bank.

Fourth standard design (1990–2000)Edit

South Africa 1 cent 1993

1993 coin

South Africa 1 cent 1996

1996 coin

South Africa 1 cent 1999

1999 coin

From 1989 to 1991, the Reserve Bank of South Africa released a series of redesigned 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 cent and 1 and 2 rand pieces into circulation. These were later joined in 1994 by the first circulating 5 rand piece. Initially, each of the coins featured legends in English and Afrikaans, the official languages of South Africa per the 1983 Constitution. However, following the abolition of apartheid and the recognition of nine new official languages by the 1996 Constitution, the legends on the coins were modified in 1996. The 1 cent piece of the new series was struck with English and Afrikaans text from 1990 to 1995, Swazi and Zulu legends in 1996, and Southern Ndebele inscriptions from 1997 to 2000.

The 1 cent piece is composed of copper-plated steel and measures 1.5 grams in mass, 15 millimeters in diameter, and 1.3 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a plain edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and undecorated.

The obverse, designed by Arthur Sutherland, features the 1932 coat of arms of South Africa in its center, the "ALS" initials of the artist engraved in small print below. On coins produced from 1990 to 1995, the English legend "SOUTH AFRICA" is written clockwise along the rim to the left, while the Afrikaans equivalent, "SUID-AFRIKA", is displayed in the same direction at the periphery to the right. The two legends are separated by a circular point at the top of the obverse. Pieces from 1996 instead show the Swazi and Zulu name of South Africa, "ININGIZIMU AFRIKA", while examples produced from 1997 to 2000 feature the Southern Ndebele name, "ISEWULA AFRIKA". The legends on these later pieces instead curve clockwise along the coin's upper rim. Written in the opposite direction at the lower periphery is the Gregorian date of minting.

The reverse was designed by South African artist William Lumley. In its center, it displays an illustration of two Cape sparrows perched on a branch. A large numeral "1" separates the birds, and is followed by the letter "c", an abbreviation for "cent", which is displayed below the second sparrow. Engraved in small print below the first bird are the "WL" initials of the artist.

From 1990 to 1995, around 1,176,290,694 cents were produced, including 1,176,160,264 business strikes, 68,263 Brilliant Uncirculated coins, 10,473 specimens, and 51,694 proofs. All of the uncirculated, specimen, and proof pieces were sold in official sets.

In 1996, about 255,004,827 pieces were made, including a large number of business strikes, a smaller amount of Brilliant Uncirculated coins, and 4,827 proofs. All of the uncirculated and proof pieces were distributed in sets.

From 1997 to 2000, 1,933,014,124 coins were produced, including a large number of business strikes, a smaller amount of Brilliant Uncirculated pieces, 4,236 specimens, and 14,124 proofs. All of the uncirculated, specimen, and proof coins were sold in sets.

Mintages
Year Language Mintage
1990 English and Afrikaans 149,000,000
1990 Proof 10,230
1991 379,000,000
1991 Proof 11,800
1992 213,000,000
1992 Proof 10,260
1993 178,000,000
1993 Proof 7,790
1994 239,000
1994 Proof 5,804
1995 257,000,000
1995 Proof 5,810
Total 1,176,290,694
1996 Swazi/Zulu 255,000,000
1996 Proof 4,827
Total 255,004,827
1997 Southern Ndebele 428,000,000
1997 Proof 3,596
1998 548,000,000
1998 Proof 3,051
1999 370,000,000
1999 Proof 3,774
2000 587,000,000
2000 Proof 3,703
Total 1,933,014,124

Final coin (2000–2001)Edit

South Africa 1 cent 2001

2001 coin

With the intention of highlighting post-apartheid democracy and a new sense of patriotism in South Africa, the South African government adopted a new coat of arms in 2000. This change was immediately reflected on South African currency, with a new series of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 cent and 1, 2, and 5 rand pieces bearing the new arms being introduced in 2000. The 1 cent piece of the series, produced from 2000 to 2001, was the last coin of its denomination to be released by South African authorities. The South African Reserve Bank publicly announced the coin's discontinuation on March 28, 2001, indicating that its production cost, about 9 cents per piece, had begun to exceed its nominal value.

The final 1 cent piece is composed of copper-plated steel and measures 1.5 grams in mass, 15 millimeters in diameter, and 1.3 millimeters in thickness. It has medallic alignment and a plain edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and undecorated.

The coin's obverse, designed by Arthur Sutherland, displays the 2000 coat of arms of South Africa in its center. Such an illustration consists of a central escutcheon featuring two human figures with clasped hands, surrounded by ears of wheat and surmounted by a crossing knobkerrie and spear, a stylized Protea flower, secretary bird (Sagittarius serpentarius), and rising sun. In addition, encircling the lower part of the arms are four elephant (Loxodonta africana) tusks and a ribbon bearing the ǀXam national motto "ǃKE E: ǀXARRA ǁKE", which translates to English as "Diverse People Unite". Engraved in small print below the rendition of the arms are the "ALS" initials of the artist, and displayed in a larger font at the rim above is the Gregorian date of minting. The Southern Ndebele name of South Africa, "ISEWULA AFRIKA", is inscribed counterclockwise from the upper left to upper right rims, the words separated from one another by the coat of arms.

The reverse, designed by William Lumley, is identical to that of 1990 cent. It features two Cape sparrows on a branch in its center, along with the face value "1 c" and the "WL" initials of the artist.

A total of 1,191,003,678 examples of the coin were produced, including 1,190,994,423 business strikes, 5,577 Brilliant Uncirculated pieces, and 3,678 proofs. All of the uncirculated and proof coins were distributed in sets by the South African Reserve Bank.

Mintages
Year Mintage
2000 587,000,000
2001 604,000,000
2001 Proof 3,678
Total 1,191,003,678

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

Template:South African rand

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