FANDOM


This article is about all official Spanish 1 peseta coins issued from 1869 to 2001. For other Spanish coins of the same denomination, see Spanish 1 peseta coin (disambiguation).
Peseta
Spain 1 peseta 1998
1998 coin
General information
Country

Flag of Spain Spain

Used by

Flag of Andorra Andorra
Flag of Spain Spain
Flag of Spain Spanish Empire (until 1975)

Measurements and composition
Mass
  • 5 g (1869-1937)
  • 3.5 g (1944-1982)
  • 1.2 g (1982-1989)
  • 0.55 g (1989-2001)
Diameter
  • 23 mm (1869-1937)
  • 21 mm (1944-1989)
  • 14 mm (1989-2001)
Thickness
  • 1.5 mm (1869-1933)
  • 2 mm (1937)
  • 1.35 mm (1944)
  • 1.6 mm (1948-2001)
Composition
Appearance
Shape

round

Alignment

coin

Edge
  • reeded (1869-1982)
  • plain (1982-2001)
Obverse

see text

Reverse

see text

v · d · e

The 1 peseta coin is a former circulation piece of Spain. It was issued in 20 types from 1869 to 2001: two under the Provisional Government of 1868–1871, six under the Restoration-era Kingdom of Spain, two under the Second Spanish Republic, three under the Spanish State, and seven under the contemporary Kingdom of Spain. Each was distributed by the Bank of Spain and struck at the Royal Mint in Madrid, Spain.

The first two coins of the denomination were introduced in 1869 under the Provisional Government of 1868–1871. One was issued solely in 1869, whereas the other continued to be struck until 1873.

Under the Restoration-era Kingdom of Spain, six peseta coins were released. The first was issued in 1876, during the early reign of King Alfonso XII (1857–1885; r. 1873–1885). It was followed in 1881 by a second type of Alfonso XII, which continued to be produced annually until 1886, a year after the king's death. Under his successor, King Alfonso XIII (1886–1941; r. 1886–1931), a redesigned third type was then issued in 1889 and 1891. As the young king grew in age, his portrait on the peseta changed three times. The first modified likeness was used on a new type distributed from 1893 to 1894. This piece was followed by another type struck from 1896 to 1903, and then a final coin manufactured from 1903 to 1905. Another peseta was evidently planned for 1927, during the Alfonso's later reign, but was never released.

During the brief existence of the Second Spanish Republic, two peseta coins were introduced. The first was issued in 1933, two years after the proclamation of the new republic, and the second was introduced in 1937.

During the dictatorship of Caudillo Francisco Franco (1892–1975; i.o. 1936–1975) from 1936 to 1975, three coins of the denomination were released into circulation. The first was issued solely in 1944. It was followed in 1948 by a new piece featuring Franco's likeness, which remained in production until 1967. A slightly redesigned type was then produced from then until Franco's death in 1975.

Seven peseta coins were then issued under the contemporary Kingdom of Spain. The first was introduced in 1976 during the early reign of King Juan Carlos I (1938–; r. 1975–2014). It was then produced annually until 1980. In anticipation of the upcoming 1982 FIFA World Cup in Spain, a circulating commemorative peseta was introduced in 1980 and produced annually until 1982. It was immediately followed by a new standard circulation piece issued from 1982 to 1989, which was in turn replaced by a final peseta distributed from 1989 to 2001. A non-circulating piece commemorating the Third National Numismatic Exposition in Madrid was also issued in 1987, and additional coins celebrating the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona and the "end of the peseta" were released in 1992 and 2001, respectively.

Prior to their eventual demonetization, each of the coins circulated for a nominal value of 1.00 peseta in Spain and its colonies and in neighboring Andorra. Since February 28, 2002, the final type can be exchanged at the Bank of Spain for a value of about 0.006 euros. It will remain exchangeable until December 31, 2020.

CoinsEdit

Coins of the Provisional Government (1869–1873)Edit

Spain 1 peseta 1869

1869 coin

ESP-1pta1870

1870 coin

In 1868, members of the Liberal Union, Progressive Party, and Democratic Party launched a revolution against the government of Queen Isabella II (1830–1904; r. 1833–1868). This short insurrection was successful, and Isabella was deposed and forced to flee to France, where she lived in exile until her death in 1904. A temporary Provisional Government was then established in place of the monarchy in 1868, which continued to operate until the inauguration of King Amadeo I (1845–1890; r. 1870–1873) in 1871.

On October 19, 1868, Laureano Figuerola (1816–1903), the first Minister of Finance and Public Administration of the Spanish Provisional Government, issued a decree establishing the peseta as the new monetary unit of Spain. Per this legislation, the peseta was to replace the escudo at a rate of 2½ to 1 and follow the standards of the nascent Latin Monetary Union (LMU). From 1869 to 1870, the Bank of Spain released the first series of coins for the new currency, which consisted of pieces denominated at 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 céntimos and 1, 2, 5, and 100 pesetas in the specifications of the LMU. The peseta of this series, which was issued in two types, was struck from 1869 to 1873 at the Royal Mint in Madrid and designed by French-born artist and Chief Engraver Luis Marchionni y Hombrón (1815–1894). Both types were eventually demonetized and withdrawn from circulation on February 20, 1939.

Both pesetas are composed of .835 fine silver and measure 5 grams in mass, 23 millimeters in diameter, and 1.5 millimeters in thickness. They have coin alignment and reeded edges, and like most coins, are round in shape. The rims of both sides of each piece are raised and decorated with a dentilated border.

The design of the obverse was inspired by denarii of Roman Emperor Hadrian (76–138; r. 117–138), who hailed from the Roman province of Hispania Baetica in what is now southern Spain. An illustration of Hispania, the national personification of Spain, appears in the center of the coin. She is portrayed wearing a crown and holding an olive branch, reclining between representations of the Pyrenees and Gibraltar. On earlier coins, the Spanish legend "GOBIERNO PROVISIONAL" (English: "Provisional Government") is engraved clockwise along the periphery above. Later pieces, however, feature the inscription "ESPAÑA", Spanish for "Spain", surrounded by two six-pointed stars in its place. The first of the two stars contains the digits "18", while the second contains the number "69", "70", or "73". Combined, these numbers represent the date the coin was manufactured. The "L.M." initials of the artist additionally appear in the exergue below Hispania, as does the Gregorian date of authorization, either "1869" or "1870". On earlier pieces, the date is flanked by two six-pointed stars.

The coat of arms of Spain at the time is illustrated in the middle of both coin's reverse. It consists of a central escutcheon containing an illustrations of a castle (Castile), crowned lion rampant (León), nine vertical bars (Aragon), linked chains (Navarre), and a pomegranate (Granada). The escutcheon in the arms is surmounted by a mural crown and flanked by the Pillars of Hercules, which are bound by a ribbon bearing the national motto "PLUS ULTRA" (Latin for "further beyond"). On the coin, printed clockwise along the rim above the arms is the Spanish legend "200 PIEZAS EN KILOGRAMO", which translates as "100 pieces in a kilogram" and indicates the coin's mass. The face value "UNA PESETA" (English: "one peseta") is engraved in the opposite direction at the rim below, and is flanked to the left by the initials of two mint assayers (see below) and to the right by the mark of the balance judge. The assayer initials are each followed by a small circular point, and the judge's mark is flanked by two points.

Around 7,000,000 examples of the first type were manufactured in 1869, and about 9,029,997 examples of the second were produced in 1869 and 1870. Only business strikes of both are known to exist.

Mintages
Auth. date Actual date Assayer marks Mintage
GOBIERNO PROVISIONAL
1869 1869 S (Santullano)
N (Narváez)
M (Mendoza)
7,000,000
ESPAÑA
1869 1869 S (Santullano)
N (Narváez)
M (Mendoza)
367,000
1870 1870 3,865,000
1873 D (Díaz)
E (Escosura)
M (Mendoza)
5,164,997
Total 9,029,997

Coins of the Bourbon Restoration (1876–1905)Edit

Coins of Alfonso XII (1876–1885)Edit

First portrait (1876)Edit
Spain 1 peseta 1876

1876 coin

After the deposition of Isabella II, the Cortes Generales decided to reinstate Spain's constitutional monarchy under a new dynasty. Prince Amadeo of the Italian House of Savoy, the Duke of Aosta and secondborn son of King Victor Emmanuel II (1820–1878; r. 1861–1878), was elected the new Spanish monarch in 1870. However, because of rising instability during his reign, Amadeo voluntarily abdicated and returned to Italy in 1873.

Almost immediately after Amadeo's departure, the Cortes founded the First Spanish Republic in 1873. This new government, however, operated for little over a year before it was overthrown by anti-republican forces in 1874. The Kingdom of Spain was then reestablished, and the monarchy was restored under the House of Bourbon. Prince Alfonso, the firstborn son of Isabella, then ascended the throne as King Alfonso XII in 1874.

Under the new monarch, a series of redesigned 5 and 10 céntimo and 1, 5, 10, and 25 peseta pieces was released from 1876 to 1878. The 1 peseta piece of this series, which was struck in 1876 at the Royal Mint in Madrid, was designed by Spanish artist and Chief Engraver Gregorio Sellán y González (1829–?). It was eventually demonetized and withdrawn from circulation on February 20, 1939.

The coin is composed of .835 fine silver and measures 5 grams in mass, 23 millimeters in diameter, and 1.5 millimeters in thickness. It has coin alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and decorated with a dentilated border.

A left-facing bust of Alfonso XII appears in the center of the obverse, the "G.S." initials of the artist engraved in small print in the bust truncation. It is accompanied by the Spanish caption "ALFONSO XII POR LA G. DE DIOS", which is shortened for Alfonso XII, por la Gracia de Dios and translates as "Alfonso XII, by the Grace of God". This text is engraved clockwise from the coin's lower left to lower right peripheries and is separated between the words "POR" and "LA" by the Alfonso's head. Written in the opposite direction at the periphery below is the Gregorian date of authorization, which is flanked on both sides by a six-pointed star. The left star contains the digits "18", while the second contains "76" (or erroneously an "18"), indicating production in 1876.

The coat of arms of the revived Kingdom of Spain is illustrated in the middle of the coin's reverse. Such an image is very similar to the arms of the Provisional Republic and First Spanish Republic, but the arms of the House of Bourbon appear in the center of the escutcheon and the mural crown is replaced by the Spanish Royal Crown. Printed clockwise along the rim above on the coin is the Spanish legend "REY CONST.L DE ESPAÑA", which is abbreviated for Rey Constitucional de España and translates as "Constitutional King of Spain". The face value "UNA PESETA" is engraved in the opposite direction at the rim below, and is flanked to the left by the initials of two mint assayers (see below) and to the right by the mark of the balance judge. The assayer initials are each followed by a small circular point, and the judge's mark is flanked by two points.

Around 4,427,000 examples of the coin were manufactured during a single year of production. Only business strikes of this type are known to exist.

Mintages
Auth. date Actual date Assayer marks Mintage
1876 1818 (error) D (Díaz)
E (Escosura)
M (Mendoza)
4,427,000
1876
Second portrait (1881–1886)Edit
Spain 1 peseta 1885

1885 coin

Although only three years had passed since the first coins of Alfonso XII were introduced, Gregorio Sellán y González was tasked with preparing a new coin portrait of the young king around 1879. The first coin to feature the new likeness, a 2 peseta piece, was released that year by the Bank of Spain. It was then followed by a new 50 céntimo piece in 1880, 1 and 25 peseta coins in 1881, and a 5 peseta piece in 1882. The peseta of the series, struck annually from 1881 to 1886 at the Royal Mint, was eventually demonetized on February 20, 1939.

The coin is composed of .835 fine silver and measures 5 grams in mass, 23 millimeters in diameter, and 1.5 millimeters in thickness. It has coin alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and decorated with a dentilated border.

A left-facing bust of Alfonso XII appears in the center of the obverse, the "G.S." initials of the artist engraved in small print near the bust truncation below. This illustration portrays the king with a curved-tipped mustache and long sideburns, both of which Alfonso adopted later in his reign. Printed clockwise from the coin's lower left to lower right peripheries is the Spanish legend "ALFONSO XII POR LA G. DE DIOS", which is separated between the words "POR" and "LA" by the king's likeness. Engraved in the opposite direction at the periphery below is the Gregorian date of authorization, which is flanked on both sides by two six-pointed stars. The first two digits in the date of minting appear in the first star, while the next two appear in the second star.

The reverse is nearly identical to that of the first peseta of Alfonso XII. The coat of arms of the revived Kingdom of Spain is illustrated in the center. Printed clockwise along the rim above is the Spanish legend "REY CONST.L DE ESPAÑA", and engraved in the opposite direction at the rim below is the face value "UNA PESETA". This indication of the coin's value is flanked to the left by the initials of two mint assayers (see below) and to the right by the mark of the balance judge. The assayer initials are each followed by a small circular point, and the judge's mark is flanked by two points.

Approximately 20,039,845 examples of the coin were manufactured during six consecutive years of production. Only business strikes of this type are known to exist.

Mintages
Auth. date Actual date Assayer marks Mintage
1881 1881 M (Morejón)
S (Salas)
M (Mendoza)
798,809
1882 1882 3,505,024
1883 1883 8,445,839
1884 1884 3,336,386
1885 1885 2,425,369
1886 1,528,418
Total 20,039,845

Coins of Alfonso XIII (1889–1905)Edit

First portrait (1889–1891)Edit
Spain 1 peseta 1891

1891 coin

After reigning for about 11 years, Alfonso XII died unexpectedly of dysentery on November 25, 1885. Under normal circumstances, Alfonso's oldest daughter, Princess Mercedes (1880–1904), would have succeeded him as Queen Regnant of Spain. However, because Queen Maria Christina (1858–1929) was pregnant at the time of Alfonso's death, the Cortes decided to temporarily leave the throne unoccupied until the child was born. On May 17, 1886, Maria Christina gave birth to her only son, Prince Alfonso, who ascended the throne as King Alfonso XIII per the rule of male primogeniture for succession. His mother served as queen regent in his place until he came of age in 1902.

Shortly into Alfonso's de jure reign, the Royal Mint of Spain began preparing a new coin series featuring the young king. Gregorio Sellán y González was tasked with designing the coin portrait, which appeared for the first time on a 20 peseta piece in 1887. It was then incorporated on a 5 peseta coin in 1888 and 50 céntimo and 1 and 2 peseta coins in 1889. The peseta of the series, struck in 1889 and 1891 at the Royal Mint in Madrid, was eventually demonetized on February 20, 1939.

The coin is composed of .835 fine silver and measures 5 grams in mass, 23 millimeters in diameter, and 1.5 millimeters in thickness. It has coin alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and decorated with a dentilated border.

A left-facing illustration of Alfonso XIII as an infant or toddler appears in the center of the obverse, the "G.S." initials of the artist engraved in small print below. Printed clockwise from the coin's lower left to lower right peripheries is the Spanish legend "ALFONSO XIII POR LA G. DE DIOS", which is separated between the numeral "XIII" and word "POR" by the king's likeness. Engraved in the opposite direction at the periphery below is the Gregorian authorization date of the coin, which is flanked on both sides by two six-pointed stars. The first two digits in the date of minting appear in the first star, while the next two appear in the second star.

The coat of arms of the Kingdom of Spain is illustrated in the center of the reverse. Printed clockwise along the rim above is the Spanish legend "REY CONST.L DE ESPAÑA", and engraved in the opposite direction at the rim below is the face value "UNA PESETA". This indication of the coin's value is flanked to the left by the initials of two mint assayers (see below) and to the right by the mark of the balance judge. The assayer initials are each followed by a small circular point, and the judge's mark is flanked by two points.

Around 5,708,225 examples of the coin were manufactured during two years of production. Only business strikes of this type are known to exist.

Mintages
Auth. date Actual date Assayer marks Mintage
1889 1889 M (Morejón)
P (Peiró)
M (Mendoza)
760,000
1891 1891 P (Peiró)
G (García)
M (Mendoza)
4,948,225
Total 5,708,225
Second portrait (1893–1894)Edit
Alfonso13pta1 1893

1893 coin

Around 1892, the Royal Mint in Madrid instructed Gregorio Sellán y González to prepare a new coin portrait of King Alfonso XIII. The new likeness, which portrayed a five or six-year-old Alfonso, was first incorporated on 5 and 20 peseta coins in 1892. It then began appearing on 1 peseta coins in 1893 and 50 céntimo and 2 peseta pieces in 1894. The peseta of the series, struck in 1893 and 1894 at the Royal Mint of Madrid, was eventually demonetized on February 20, 1939.

The coin is composed of .835 fine silver and measures 5 grams in mass, 23 millimeters in diameter, and 1.5 millimeters in thickness. It has coin alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and decorated with a dentilated border.

A left-facing bust of a curly-haired five or six-year-old King Alfonso XIII is displayed in the middle of the obverse, the "G.S." initials of the artist inscribed in small print below. Engraved clockwise from the lower left to lower right rims is the Spanish legend "ALFONSO XIII POR LA G. DE DIOS", which is separated between the words "POR" and "LA" by the king's head. Displayed in the opposite direction at the periphery below is the Gregorian authorization date of the coin, which is flanked on both sides by two six-pointed stars. The first two digits in the date of minting appear in the first star, while the next two appear in the second star.

The coat of arms of the Kingdom of Spain is illustrated in the center of the reverse. Printed clockwise along the rim above is the Spanish legend "REY CONST.L DE ESPAÑA", and engraved in the opposite direction at the rim below is the face value "UNA PESETA". This indication of the coin's value is flanked to the left by the initials of two mint assayers (see below) and to the right by the mark of the balance judge. The assayer initials are each followed by a small circular point, and the judge's mark is flanked by two points.

Approximately 3,002,000 examples of the coin were produced. Only business strikes of this type are known to exist.

Mintages
Auth. date Actual date Assayer marks Mintage
1893 1893 P (Peiró)
G (García)
L (Liceranzu)
1,958,000
1894 1894 P (Peiró)
G (García)
V (Vega)
1,044,000
Total 3,002,000
Third portrait (1896–1902)Edit
1 Peseta à l'effigie d'Alphonse XIII, refrappe de 1897 sur un modèle daté de 1896

1896 coin

In 1895, the Royal Mint of Spain decided to introduce yet another series of Spanish circulation coins. Spanish engraver Bartolomé Maura y Montaner (1844–1926), Sellán's successor at the mint, was tasked with designing a portrait of the 9-year-old King Alfonso XIII for the new pieces. His depiction of the young monarch first appeared on 5 peseta coins in 1895, and then began to be used on 50 céntimo and 1 and 20 peseta pieces in 1896 and 100 peseta coins in 1897. The peseta of the series, struck in annually from 1896 to 1902 at the Royal Mint of Madrid, was eventually demonetized on February 20, 1939.

The coin is composed of .835 fine silver and measures 5 grams in mass, 23 millimeters in diameter, and 1.5 millimeters in thickness. It has coin alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and decorated with a dentilated border.

A left-facing portrait of a 9-year-old King Alfonso XIII is displayed in the center of the obverse, the "B.M." initials of the artist engraved in small print below. Engraved clockwise from the lower left to lower right rims is the Spanish legend "ALFONSO XIII POR LA G. DE DIOS", which is separated between the numeral "XIII" and word "POR" by the king's likeness. Displayed in the opposite direction at the periphery below is the Gregorian authorization date of the coin, which is flanked on both sides by two six-pointed stars. The first two digits in the date of minting appear in the first star, while the next two appear in the second star.

The coat of arms of the Kingdom of Spain is illustrated in the center of the reverse. Printed clockwise along the rim above is the Spanish legend "REY CONST.L DE ESPAÑA", and engraved in the opposite direction at the rim below is the face value "UNA PESETA". This indication of the coin's value is flanked to the left by the initials of two mint assayers (see below) and to the right by the mark of the balance judge. The assayer initials are each followed by a small circular point, and the judge's mark is flanked by two points.

About 43,582,000 examples of the coin were manufactured. Only business strikes of this type are known to exist.

Mintages
Auth. date Actual date Assayer marks Mintage
1896 1896 P (Peiró)
G (García)
V (Vega)
6,412,000
1899 1866 (error) S (Sandoval)
G (García)
V (Vega)
7,472,000
1899
1900 1900 S (Sandoval)
M (Martínez)
V (Vega)
18,650,000
1901 0119 (error) 8,449,000
1901
1919 (error)
1902 1902 2,599,000
Total 43,582,000
Fourth portrait (1903–1912)Edit
Spain 1 peseta 1903

1903 coin

King Alfonso XIII finally came of age to rule on May 17, 1902, the date of his sixteenth birthday. That day, before members of the Cortes, he formally swore to uphold the Spanish Constitution and faithfully carry out his constitutional duties as King. To reflect his accession on Spanish currency, in 1903 the Royal Mint of Spain instructed Bartolomé Maura y Montaner to produce a new portrait of the Alfonso XIII for use on a new coin series. A peseta featuring the new likeness was released in 1903, followed by 2 and 50 céntimo and 20 peseta coins in 1904, a 2 peseta piece in 1905, and a 1 céntimo coin in 1906. The peseta of the series, struck from 1903 to 1905 and again in 1912 at the Royal Mint in Madrid, was eventually demonetized on February 20, 1939.

The coin is composed of .835 fine silver and measures 5 grams in mass, 23 millimeters in diameter, and 1.5 millimeters in thickness. It has coin alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and decorated with a dentilated border.

A left-facing illustration of a teenage King Alfonso XIII wearing the high-collared uniform of a Captain General appears in the center of the obverse. Engraved in small print in the base of this depiction are the "B.M." initials of the artist. The Spanish legend "ALFONSO XIII POR LA G. DE DIOS", interrupted between the numeral "XIII" and word "POR", accompanies the image, extending clockwise from the coin's lower left to lower right peripheries. Displayed in the opposite direction at the periphery below is the Gregorian authorization date of the coin, which is flanked on both sides by two six-pointed stars. The first two digits in the date of minting appear in the first star, while the next two appear in the second star.

The coat of arms of the Kingdom of Spain is illustrated in the center of the reverse. Printed clockwise along the rim above is the Spanish legend "REY CONST.L DE ESPAÑA", and engraved in the opposite direction at the rim below is the face value "UNA PESETA". This indication of the coin's value is flanked to the left by the initials of two mint assayers (see below) and to the right by the mark of the balance judge. The assayer initials are each followed by a small circular point, and the judge's mark is flanked by two points.

About 16,388,000 examples of the coin were manufactured. Only business strikes of this type are known to exist.

Mintages
Auth. date Actual date Assayer marks Mintage
1903 1903 S (Sandoval)
M (Martínez)
V (Vega)
10,602,000
1904 1904 5,294,000
1905 1905 492,000
1912 Unknown
Total 16,388,000
Planned fifth portrait (1927)Edit
Spain 50 centimos 1926

50 céntimo coin of 1926

From 1925 to 1927, the Bank of Spain issued the last coin series of the Restoration-era Kingdom of Spain. Consisting of two 25 céntimo pieces and a single 50 céntimo coin, this series utilized original designs by Spanish engravers José Espinós Gisbert (1877–1956) and Enrique Vaquer (1874–1931). Two peseta patterns in the design of Vaquer's 50 céntimo piece were also struck in limited quantities in 1927 but never released into circulation.

The coins are composed of .835 fine silver and measures 5 grams in mass, 23 millimeters in diameter, and 1.5 millimeters in thickness. They have coin alignment and a reeded edge, and are round in shape. Both of the rims of each piece are raised and decorated with a dentilated border.

A left-facing bust of a mustached Alfonso XIII appears in the center of the obverse of both types. Engraved in small print at the bottom of the illustration is the "E.VAQUER" signature of the artist. The Spanish legend "ALFONSO XIII REY DE ESPAÑA", which translates as "Alfonso XIII, King of Spain", is inscribed clockwise along the periphery above, while the face value "UNA PESETA" is printed in the opposite direction at the rim below. Two six-pointed stars separate the two inscriptions, the first containing the first two digits of the date "1927" and the second bearing the last two digits.

The reverse of one type features the coat of arms of the Kingdom of Spain in its center. In this rendition, an oval-shaped Spanish escutcheon appears in the middle, and is surrounded by the chain of the Order of the Golden Fleece and other decorative elements and surmounted by the Spanish Royal Crown. The face value "1 P.", abbreviated for 1 Peseta, is engraved in the middle of the piece, the numeral displayed to the left of the arms and the letter to the right. Engraved counterclockwise at the periphery below the arms is the Gregorian date of minting, "1927".

The reverse of the second type more closely resembles that of the contemporary 50 céntimo coin. The same coat of arms from the aforementioned type is displayed in the center, but the face value is instead displayed as "UNA PESETA" and engraved clockwise from the coin's left to right rims. The word "UNA" is flanked by decorative elements and appears to the left of the arms, while the word "PESETA" is displayed to the right. Printed counterclockwise at the bottom of the piece is the Gregorian date of minting, "1927", the first two digits separated from the last two by the Golden Fleece. The "P" and "C" initials of assayers Vidal Peiró Zafra and Rafael Caro Fresneda, respectively, are engraved in small print at the coin's lower left rim, while the "S" initial of balance judge Julio Segura Calvé is inscribed in a small font at the lower right periphery. Each initial is flanked by two points.

The mintage of the first type is currently unknown. Around 5 or 6 examples of the second are believed to exist.

Coins of the Second Spanish Republic (1934–1937)Edit

Seated Hispania coin (1934)Edit

1934 1 Peseta

1934 coin

Under Prime Ministers Miguel Primo de Rivera (1870–1930; i.o. 1923–1930) and Dámaso Berenguer (1873–1953; i.o. 1930–1931), the urban population in Spain began to lose confidence in the monarchy. This was reflected in the municipal elections of 1931, in which voters in urban areas overwhelmingly voted for republican, socialist, and communist candidates. In response to this public dissatisfaction in the kingdom, King Alfonso XIII fled from Spain to Rome on April 14, 1931, and the Second Spanish Republic was established in his absence on that date.

Under the new government, the Bank of Spain released new 25 céntimo and 1 peseta coins in 1934. Both were designed by Spanish engraver José Espinós Gisbert and struck at the Royal Mint in Madrid. The peseta of this series, authorized in 1933 but not struck until 1934, was eventually demonetized on February 20, 1939, after the fall of the Second Republic.

The coin is composed of .835 fine silver and measures 5 grams in mass, 23 millimeters in diameter, and 1.5 millimeters in thickness. It has coin alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and decorated with a dentilated border.

A left-facing illustration of Hispania, a personification of the Republic, is displayed in the center of the obverse. She is portrayed seated and holding an olive branch, a symbol of peace and victory. Printed clockwise along the rim to the left is the Spanish name of the Spanish Republic, rendered as "REPUBLICA ESPAÑOLA" without the acute over the "U". The Gregorian date of authorization, "1933", appears in the exergue below Hispania, and is flanked on both sides by a six-pointed star. The first star contains the digit "3" while the second bears the number "4", indicating production in 1934.

The coat of arms of the Second Spanish Republic, which is identical to that of the Provisional Government of 1868–1871, is displayed in the middle of the reverse. Engraved counterclockwise along the periphery below is the face value "UNA PESETA".

About 2,000,000 examples of the coin, all business strikes, were manufactured during a single year of production.

Hispania head coin (1937)Edit

1937 1 Peseta

1937 coin

On July 17, 1936, a Nationalist coalition of Falangists, Electoral Carlists, conservative Catholics, and monarchists attempted to overthrow the republican government of Spain in a military coup. However, after failing to take complete control of Spain, the Nationalists faced resistance from a unified Republican faction supportive of the government. This conflict, which eventually escalated into a full-scale civil war, finally ended with a Nationalist victory on April 1, 1939. In the aftermath of the war, the Second Republic was officially dissolved and replaced by a Falangist regime ruled by Francisco Franco.

From 1937 to 1938, during the middle of the Spanish Civil War, the Second Spanish Republic issued its last series of circulating coins. Consisting of denominations of 5, 10, 25, and 50 céntimos and 1 peseta, this series was struck at the Madrid, Castellón de la Plana, and Aspe branch mints of the Royal Mint of Spain. A 25 céntimo piece was also issued by the Nationalists during the period, and several local coins were also released by both factions. The peseta of the series, colloquially known as the peseta de Negrín (English: "Negrín's peseta") after Prime Minister Juan Negrín (1892–1956; i.o. 1937–1939) and la Rubia (English: "the Blonde") for its color, was produced solely in 1937. It was eventually withdrawn and removed from circulation.

Because the republican government could not strike coins in silver during the Spanish Civil War, the 1937 peseta is instead composed of a brass alloy and has a thickness of 2 millimeters. However, like the earlier silver pesetas, it measures 5 grams in mass and 23 millimeters in diameter. The piece has coin alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and decorated with a dentilated border.

A left-facing bust of Hispania appears in the center of the obverse, the Spanish legend "REPVBLICA ESPAÑOLA" engraved clockwise along the rim to the left.

A depiction of grapes on a vine is displayed in the upper left portion of the coin's reverse. It is accompanied by the face value "1 PESETA" and the Gregorian date of minting, "1937". The numeral in the value, which is rendered in large bold print, appears to the left of the grapes while the word "PESETA" is engraved horizontally in a smaller font below. The date appears below "PESETA" at the bottom of the piece.

Approximately 50,000,000 examples of the coin were manufactured during a single year of production. Only business strikes of this type are known to exist.

Coins of the Spanish State (1944–1975)Edit

First coin (1944)Edit

1944 1 Peseta

1944 coin

After the Spanish Civil War ended in 1939, the Nationalists replaced the Second Republic with the Spanish State, a one-party totalitarian dictatorship led by Caudillo Francisco Franco and the Falange. The first coins of the new regime, low-valued 5 and 10 céntimo pieces, were introduced in 1940. They were then followed in 1944 by a redesigned peseta and a peseta coin. The peseta, struck solely in 1944 at the Royal Mint in Madrid, was eventually withdrawn and demonetized. It was designed by Spanish artist Carlos Mingo López.

The coin is composed of an aluminum-bronze alloy and measures 3.5 grams in mass, 21 millimeters in diameter, and 1.35 millimeters in thickness. It has coin alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and decorated with a beaded border.

An illustration of the coat of arms of the Spanish State appears in the center of the coin's obverse. Such a depiction consists of a haloed Eagle of Saint John between the Pillars of Hercules, a crowned escutcheon illustrated on its breast. The escutcheon contains representations of the former kingdoms of Castile, León, Aragon, Navarre, and Granada, and the Pillars are surrounded by a ribbon containing the Latin motto "PLUS ULTRA". Another ribbon bearing the Spanish motto "UNA GRANDE LIBRE" (English: "One, Great and Free") also appears near the eagle's head, and a yoke and bundle of five arrows, symbols of the Catholic monarchs and the Falange, are additionally illustrated below. On the coin, printed clockwise along the rim to the left of the arms, is the Spanish legend "ESPAÑA". The Gregorian date of minting, "1944", is engraved in the same direction at the periphery to the right, flanked on both sides by a decorative element.

The face value "1 PESETA" is displayed in the middle of the obverse, the numeral partially superimposed by the following word. It is surrounded by a decorative border containing illustrations of a lion rampant (León), linked chains (Navarre), a bundle of five arrows (Catholic monarchs and the Falange), a pomegranate (Granada), nine horizontal bars (Aragon), and a castle (Castile).

Around 150,000,000 examples of the coin were manufactured during a single year of production. Only business strikes are known to exist.

San Carlos Shipyard coins (1948)Edit

Between 1946 and 1948, the Royal Mint in Madrid commissioned the Spanish Society for Naval Construction (SECN) to manufacture six coin presses. Each machine was assembled at the San Carlos Shipyard in Cádiz, a workshop acquired by the SECN on September 29, 1923. Before the presses were transported to Madrid, they were tested on site on October 15, 1948, with Francisco Franco in attendance. Two designs and three types of non-circulating pesetas were struck using the presses, one commemorating Franco's visit and another simply identifying where the coins were produced. The dies for these strikes were prepared by the Spanish Society of Electromechanical Constructions in Córdoba.

Most examples are composed of aluminum-bronze and measure 3.5 grams in mass, 21 millimeters in diameter, and 1.35 millimeters in thickness. A single gold piece was also struck and presented to Francisco Franco as a souvenir. All of the coins have coin alignment and a reeded edge, and are round in shape. The rims of both sides of each piece are raised and undecorated.

The obverse of both types is identical. The logo of the Spanish Society for Naval Construction is illustrated in the center. Such an image features a Spanish ship at the top and crossing cannons and a bomb at the bottom, between two partial circles. The initials "·S·E D·C·" are displayed clockwise to the left and right of the ship, and the word "NAVAL" is engraved horizontally in larger print below. Together, these texts represent the full Spanish name of the Spanish Society for Naval Construction, Sociedad Española de Construcción Naval.

The reverse of one type features the Spanish text "PRUEBAS DE LAS MAQUINAS DE ACUÑAR CONSTRUIDAS POR TALLERES SAN CARLOS", which translates to English as "Tests of the coining machines built by the San Carlos Shipyard". "PRUEBAS" is engraved clockwise along the coin's upper rim, while the words "TALLERES SAN CARLOS" are engraved in a counterclockwise direction near the bottom of the piece. All the other words are inscribed between on five horizontal lines, with line breaks between "LAS" and "MAQUINAS", "DE" and "ACUÑAR", "ACUÑAR" and "CONSTRUIDAS", and "CONSTRUIDAS" and "POR". Engraved counterclockwise along the rim below is the Gregorian date of minting, rendered in Roman numerals as "MCMXLVIII" (1948).

The reverse of the second type features the text "VISITA DE S.E. EL CAUDILLO DE ESPAÑA", which is abbreviated for Visita de Su Excelencia, el Caudillo de España and translates as "Visit of His Excellency, the Caudillo of Spain". The word "VISITA" is engraved clockwise along the coin's upper rim, while the remaining words are engraved on three horizontal lines below, with line breaks between "DE" and "S.E." and "CAUDILLO" and "DE". The name "SAN CARLOS" is engraved on a single line below, separated from the aforementioned legend by a horizontal line. Engraved counterclockwise along the lower periphery is the date of Francisco Franco's visit, which is rendered in Roman numerals as "XV·X·MCMXLVIII" (15 October 1948).

Aside from the gold piece, which is unique, the total mintages of the 1948 test coins are currently unknown. The aluminum-bronze type commemorating Franco's visit is believed to be the rarer of the two types.

First Franco coin (1948–1967)Edit

1953 1 Pesetas

1953 coin

In 1946, the Royal Mint in Madrid received authorization to strike a new peseta coin featuring Francisco Franco. It was eventually followed by a 5 peseta piece in 1949; a 50 céntimo coin in 1951; a 2½ peseta piece in 1954; new 5, 25, and 50 peseta coins in 1958; and a redesigned 10 céntimo piece in 1959. However, although authorized in 1946, the peseta was not struck until 1947 (although dated as early as 1948) and not released into circulation until December 30 of the same year. Known colloquially as la Rubia and the peseta de Benlliure, the piece was designed by Spanish artist Mariano Benlliure (1862–1947) and later modified by Manuel Marín Jimeno. It was struck from 1948 to 1967 and finally withdrawn and demonetized on January 1, 1997.

The coin is composed of an aluminum-bronze alloy and measures 3.5 grams in mass, 21 millimeters in diameter, and 1.6 millimeters in thickness. It has coin alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and decorated with a beaded border.

A right-facing bust of Francisco Franco appears in the center of the obverse. Engraved clockwise from the lower left to lower right rims is the Spanish caption "FRANCISCO FRANCO CAUDILLO DE ESPAÑA POR LA G. DE DIOS", which is abbreviated for Francisco Franco, Caudillo de España por la Gracia de Dios and translates as "Francisco Franco, Caudillo of Spain, by the Grace of God". The Gregorian date of authorization is inscribed in the opposite direction at the periphery below, separated from the aforementioned text by two small circular points.

The coat of arms of the Spanish State is displayed in the middle of the reverse. It is accompanied by the face value "UNA PESETA", the word "UNA" displayed clockwise along the rim to the left of the arms and the word "PESETA" featured in the same direction at the periphery to the right. Two six-pointed stars flank the word "UNA". The first contains the first two digits of the year of minting, while the second features the last two digits. On around 5,000 coins struck for the 2nd National Numismatic Exposition in Madrid in 1951, the first star instead contains the letter "E" for exposición.

Around 751,804,000 examples of the coin were manufactured over 16 years of production. All examples were struck with a standard finish.

Mintages
Auth. date Star date Mintage
1946 1948 5,000
1947 15,000,000
1949 27,600,000
1950 4,000,000
1951 9,185,000
E51 5,000
1952 19,195,000
1953 34,000,000
1954 50,000,000
1956 Unknown
1953 1954 40,272,000
1956 118,000,000
1960 45,160,000
1961 25,830,000
1962 66,252,000
1963 37,000,000
1963 36,000,000
1964 80,000,000
1965 70,000,000
1966 63,000,000
1967 11,300,000
Total 751,804,000

Second Franco coin (1967–1975)Edit

1975 1 Pesetas

1975 coin

In 1966, the Royal Mint in Madrid received authorization to strike 50 céntimo and 1 and 100 peseta pieces featuring a new likeness of Francisco Franco. All three were minted later that year and then released into circulation on December 29, 1966. The peseta of the series, struck annually from 1967 to 1975 in Madrid, was eventually withdrawn and demonetized on January 1, 1997.

The coin is composed of an aluminum-bronze alloy and measures 3.5 grams in mass, 21 millimeters in diameter, and 1.6 millimeters in thickness. It has coin alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and decorated with a beaded border.

The obverse, designed by Spanish sculptor Juan de Ávalos (1911–2006), features a right-facing bust of a 72 or 73-year-old Francisco Franco in its center. Engraved clockwise from the lower left to lower right rims is the Spanish caption "FRANCISCO FRANCO CAUDILLO DE ESPAÑA POR LA G. DE DIOS", and inscribed in the opposite direction at the bottom of the piece is the Gregorian date of authorization, "1966". The date and legend are separated from one another by two small cross-shaped objects.

The reverse is identical to that of the first peseta of Franco. The coat of arms of the Spanish State is displayed in the center. It is accompanied by the face value "UNA PESETA", the word "UNA" displayed clockwise along the rim to the left of the arms and the word "PESETA" featured in the same direction at the periphery to the right. Two six-pointed stars flank the word "UNA". The first contains the first two digits of the year of minting, while the second features the last two digits.

Around 1,156,003,000 examples of the coin were produced, including 18,200 Brilliant Uncirculated pieces and 153,000 proofs. All of the uncirculated and proof pieces were distributed in official mint and proof sets by the Bank of Spain.

Mintages
Auth. date Star date Mintage
1966 1967 59,000,000
1968 120,000,000
1969 120,000,000
1970 75,000,000
1971 115,270,000
1972 106,000,000
1972 Proof 30,000
1973 152,000,000
1973 Proof 25,000
1974 181,000,000
1974 Proof 23,000
1975 227,580,000
1975 Proof 75,000
Total 1,156,003,000

Coins of the Kingdom of Spain (1975–2001)Edit

First coin of Juan Carlos I (1975–1980)Edit

1976 1 Pesetas

1976 coin

Later in his rule, Francisco Franco decided to name a monarch to succeed him as Spain's head of state. To avoid potential conflict between the Carlists and Alfonsists, Franco initially offered the throne to Archduke Otto (1912–2011) of the House of Habsburg-Lorraine. However, after the Austrian noble declined his offer, Franco was forced to choose his successor between the Bourbon claimants to the throne. In 1969, he handpicked Prince Juan Carlos, the oldest grandson of King Alfonso XIII through Infante Juan, Count of Barcelona (1913–1993), as his successor. When Franco died on November 20, 1975, the Spanish monarchy and Kingdom of Spain were restored under the newly appointed King Juan Carlos I.

In 1975, shortly after Juan Carlos ascended the throne, the Royal Mint of Spain received authorization to introduce a new series of circulation coins featuring his likeness. Consisting of denominations of 50 céntimos and 1, 5, 25, 50, and 100 pesetas, this series was released into circulation on January 5, 1976. The peseta of the series, struck annually from 1976 to 1980, was eventually withdrawn and demonetized on January 1, 1997. It was struck at the Royal Mint in Madrid during all years of production, and also at the British Royal Mint in Llantrisant, Wales, and the Chilean Mint in Santiago in 1978.

The coin is composed of an aluminum-bronze alloy and measures 3.5 grams in mass, 21 millimeters in diameter, and 1.6 millimeters in thickness. It has coin alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and decorated with a beaded border.

The obverse, designed by Spanish artist Manuel Marín Jimeno, features a left-facing bust of Juan Carlos I in its center. It is accompanied by the Spanish legend "JUAN CARLOS I REY DE ESPAÑA", which translates as "Juan Carlos I, King of Spain" and extends clockwise from the coin's lower left to lower right rims. Engraved in the opposite direction at the bottom of the piece is the Gregorian date of authorization, which is separated from the aforementioned text by two small cross-shaped objects.

The reverse is identical to those of the pesetas of Francisco Franco. The coat of arms of the Spanish State is displayed in the center. It is accompanied by the face value "UNA PESETA", the word "UNA" displayed clockwise along the rim to the left of the arms and the word "PESETA" featured in the same direction at the periphery to the right. Two six-pointed stars flank the word "UNA". The first contains the first two digits of the year of minting, while the second features the last two digits.

Over 2,115,080,000 examples of the coin were manufactured, including 1,000,000 proofs. All of the proofs were distributed in official sets by the Bank of Spain.

Mintages
Auth. date Star date Mint Mintage
1975 1976 Madrid 170,380,000
1976 Proof 400,000
1977 243,380,000
1977 Proof 300,000
1978 603,320,000
Santiago Unknown
Llantrisant Unknown
1979 Madrid 507,000,000
1979 Proof 300,000
1980 590,000,000
Total 2,115,080,000

1982 FIFA World Cup coin (1980–1982)Edit

Spain 1 peseta 1982

1982 coin

On July 6, 1966, the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) selected Spain to host the 1982 FIFA World Cup. The competition, the first (and to date only) to be held on the Iberian Peninsula, was the subject of a series of circulating commemorative Spanish coins issued from 1980 to 1982. Consisting of 50 céntimo and 1, 5, 25, 50, and 100 peseta pieces, this series was authorized in 1980 and released on October 22 of the same year. The peseta, struck annually at the Royal Mint in Madrid from 1980 to 1982, was eventually demonetized on January 1, 1997.

The coin is composed of an aluminum-bronze alloy and measures 3.5 grams in mass, 21 millimeters in diameter, and 1.6 millimeters in thickness. It has coin alignment and a reeded edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and decorated with a beaded border.

The obverse of the coin is identical to that of the first peseta of Juan Carlos I. A left-facing bust of the monarch is illustrated in the center. The Spanish legend "JUAN CARLOS I REY DE ESPAÑA" inscribed clockwise along the rim above, while the Gregorian date of authorization, separated from the aforementioned text by two small cross-shaped objects, is engraved in the opposite direction at the periphery below.

The coin's reverse was designed by Spanish artist Francisco Martínez Tornero. The coat of arms of Spain during the Spanish transition to democracy appears at the left center of the coin. Such a depiction, originally adopted in 1977, features a haloed Eagle of Saint John between the Pillars of Hercules, a crowned escutcheon illustrated on its breast. The escutcheon in the arms features representations of the kingdoms of Castile, Léon, Aragon, Navarre, and Granada, and the Pillars are surrounded by a ribbon containing the Latin motto "PLUS ULTRA". A ribbon bearing the Spanish motto "UNA GRANDE LIBRE" is additionally displayed above the eagle's head, and a yoke and bundle of five arrows is illustrated below. On the coin, the face value "1 PTA", abbreviated for 1 Peseta, is engraved to the right of the arms. The numeral in this value is engraved horizontally in large print, while the following word is rendered vertically next to it in a smaller font. Inscribed on a single line below is the Spanish legend "ESPAÑA '82", which translates as "Spain, 1982", and displayed below that is a single six-pointed star containing the last two digits of the Gregorian date of minting.

Less than 1,308,000,000 examples of the coin were produced, including an unknown number of proofs. All of the proofs were distributed in official proof sets by the Bank of Spain, and an unknown number of regular coins were also sold in unofficial mint sets.

Mintages
Auth. date Star date Mintage
1980 80 590,000,000
80 Proof Unknown
81 385,000,000
82 < 333,000,000[1]
Total < 1,308,000,000
  1. Mintage combined with that of the 1982 aluminum peseta (see below).

First aluminum coin (1982–1989)Edit

Spain 1 peseta 1988

1988 coin

In 1982, the Royal Mint in Madrid was tasked with striking a new series of Spanish circulation coins. On July 15 of that year, redesigned 5 and 25 peseta pieces were released into circulation. They were then followed on September 15 by 50 and 100 peseta coins and on November 15 by 1 and 2 peseta pieces. These would later be joined by a 200 peseta coin on July 19, 1986, and the first 500 peseta piece on November 30, 1987. Because of its low purchasing power, the 50 céntimo coin was not continued under this new series. The peseta of the series, struck annually from 1982 to 1989 in Madrid, was eventually withdrawn and demonetized on January 1, 1997.

To reduce production costs, the coin is composed of aluminum and measures 1.2 grams in mass, 21 millimeters in diameter, and 1.6 millimeters in thickness. It has coin alignment and a plain edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised and decorated with a beaded border.

The obverse, designed by Spanish artist Manuel Marín Jimeno, features a left-facing bust of Juan Carlos I in its center. The Spanish legend "JUAN CARLOS I REY DE ESPAÑA" is inscribed clockwise along the rim above, while the Gregorian date of authorization, separated from the aforementioned text by two small cross-shaped objects, is engraved in the opposite direction at the periphery below.

The reverse, designed by Manuel Martínez Tornero, shows the coat of arms of the revived Kingdom of Spain at the right center. Such an illustration consists of a central escutcheon containing symbols of the kingdoms of Castile, Léon, Aragon, Navarre, and Granada, and the arms of the House of Bourbon. It is surmounted by the Spanish Royal Crown and flanked by the Pillars of Hercules, which are surrounded by a ribbon bearing the Latin motto "PLVS VLTRA". On the coin, the arms is accompanied by the face value "1 PESETA". The numeral in the value is engraved in large print to the left, while the following word is displayed horizontally in a smaller font below. A small crowned "M" mark of the Royal Mint in Madrid additionally appears to the left of the numeral, and on coins struck for the third National Numismatic Exposition in 1987, "E-87" is also inscribed to the upper left of the arms.

Less than 1,757,510,000 examples of the coin were manufactured, including 60,000 pieces for the 1987 National Numismatic Exposition. The latter pieces were distributed in presentation sets by the Bank of Spain.

Mintages
Year Mintage
1982 < 333,000,000[1]
1983 52,000,000
1984 131,000,000
1985 220,065,000
1986 299,960,000
1987 299,550,000
1987
(E-87)
60,000
1988 223,460,000
1989 < 198,415,000[2]
Total < 1,757,510,000
  1. Mintage combined with that of the 1982 FIFA World Cup peseta (see above).
  2. Mintage combined with that of the redesigned 1989 peseta (see below).

1992 Summer Olympics coin (1992)Edit

In 1992, the 25th Summer Olympics were held in Barcelona, a coastal city in Catalonia in eastern Spain. Guests of honor, including those performing in the opening ceremony on July 25, were presented with commemorative gold pesetas celebrating the Games. Struck in 1992 at the Royal Mint in Madrid, these pieces were never released into circulation or sold directly to collectors. They were demonetized at some point during or prior to 2001.

The gold peseta is of .900 fineness and measures 6.7 grams in mass and 23 millimeters in diameter. It has coin alignment and a plain edge, and is round in shape. Both of its rims are raised, and the rim on the reverse is decorated with a beaded border.

The logo of the 1992 Summer Olympics – which consists of a stylized figure jumping over the text "Barcelona '92" and the Olympic rings – is displayed in the center of the obverse. Engraved counterclockwise along the rim below is the date of the Games' opening ceremony, "25·VII·1992·", followed by the crowned "M" mint mark of Madrid.

The coat of arms of the Kingdom of Spain appears at the right center of the reverse, accompanied by the face value "1 PESETA". The numeral in the value is engraved in large print to the left of the arms, while the following word is displayed horizontally in a smaller font below. The mark of the Royal Mint in Madrid is additionally featured in small print to the left of the numeral.

The total mintage of the coin is currently unknown. Between 100 and 300 examples are believed to exist.

Final coin (1989–2001)Edit

1993 1 Pesetas

1993 coin

In 1989, the Royal Mint of Spain began to produce what would become the penultimate series of coins of the Spanish peseta. The first piece of this series, a redesigned 5 peseta coin, was released into circulation on August 17, 1989. It was followed by a new peseta on November 24 of the same year; a 10 peseta piece (dated 1992) on January 16, 1990; a 200 peseta piece on July 6, 1990; a 100 peseta coin (dated 1992) on September 19, 1990; a 500 peseta coin on May 19, 1993; and a 2,000 peseta piece sometime in 1994. This series was eventually followed by a series of redesigned 10, 25, 50, 100, and 200 peseta coins issued from 1998 to 2000. The peseta, struck annually at Madrid from 1989 to 2001, was eventually withdrawn and demonetized on February 28, 2002. However, it can be exchanged for a value of about 0.006 euros at the Bank of Spain until December 31, 2020.

In 2001, in commemoration of the end of the peseta, the Bank of Spain issued a series silver 1, 5, 25, 100, 500, and 2,000 peseta coins in 2001. These coins remained legal tender under February 28, 2002, but as collectors' pieces, they did not circulate frequently.

The circulating coin is composed of aluminum and weighs 0.55 grams, while the silver coin is of sterling fineness and weighs 2.15 grams. Both types measure 14 millimeters in diameter and 1.55 millimeters in thickness. They have coin alignment; plain edges; and raised, undecorated rims; and are round in shape.

The obverse, designed by Spanish artist Luis Antonio García Ruiz, features a left-facing portrait of Juan Carlos I on its left side. The face value "1 PESETA" is displayed to the right, the numeral rendered horizontally in large print with the word engraved vertically inside it. Printed clockwise along the periphery above is the caption "JUAN CARLOS I", and engraved in the opposite direction at the rim below is the state title "ESPAÑA". These two inscriptions are separated from one another by a small cross-shaped object.

The coin's reverse, also designed by Luis Antonio García Ruiz, is divided into four quarters of unequal size. The quarters at the upper right and lower left are raised, while those at the upper left and lower right are incuse. The coat of arms of the Kingdom of Spain appears at the lower left side of the piece, the Gregorian date of minting and two cross-shaped objects engraved clockwise along the rim to the upper right. The crowned "M" mint mark of Madrid additionally appears to the right of the arms in the coin's lower right field.

Less than 2,464,547,000 examples of the coin were produced for circulation, and around 75,000 non-circulating silver pieces were issued in 2001.

Mintages
Year Mintage
Aluminum
1989 < 198,415,000[1]
1990 197,700,000
1991 173,780,000
1992 168,870,000
1993 300,013,000
1994 162,860,000
1995 183,175,000
1996 101,885,000
1997 342,620,000
1998 411,614,000
1999 84,946,000
2000 76,274,000
2001 62,395,000
Total < 2,464,547,000
Silver
2001 75,000
  1. Mintage combined with that of the previous 1989 peseta (see above).

ReferencesEdit

Template:Spanish peseta

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.